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Halo pros not for community just cash grab

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The Halo community was never, ever, EVER about the same things that League, Starcraft, COD, Battlefield, etc. are about - namely, sitting around watching streams and making joke content. Those are the two things that get the most attention these days, and Halo never did that. We were into Halo because we were into the sport of it, not the culture of it. Yes, it did develop its own culture, but that culture was strictly about events and LANs. 

 

So it's no surprise that almost nobody stepped up to the plate when Halo crashed. The scene wasn't built around personalities, it was based around legendary tournament play and a bunch of guys who were convinced they could do the same thing. It was because Halo died at the wrong moment and also because it never developed in the correct way to adapt to today's gaming culture that we're seeing almost no content being put out, and probably never will. 

I've recently been putting up gameplays on Youtube an still am but my content isn't going to get noticed because I'm not a big name but I'll still post anyways.

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I don't know if I agree with that. For a lot of my friends and I, Halo was definitely built around personalities. If Tsquared, Walshy, and the like came back and played I'd be watching them. There are two types of people who watch sport... those who watch their home team and those who watch for the sake of the game itself. I don't watch football, basketball, baseball, etc unless my home team is playing. And when they are, I love watching. I gotta have something or someone to root for. 

 

The same goes for Halo. Did I watch any of the games during Halo 2 that were focused on no-name teams? Not really. The only games we watched were when the big name teams came on (i.e. Final Boss, Carbon, St8 Rippin, etc). 

 

So maybe you're partially right if you belong in that category of watching sports because you like the sport. But for some of us, it was definitely about the personalities and rooting for that 'home team'. 

 

So if T2 or Walshy were perennial top-24 talents instead of top-2, you'd still root for them?

 

You're kind of proving my point.

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I don't know if I agree with that. For a lot of my friends and I, Halo was definitely built around personalities. If Tsquared, Walshy, and the like came back and played I'd be watching them. There are two types of people who watch sport... those who watch their home team and those who watch for the sake of the game itself. I don't watch football, basketball, baseball, etc unless my home team is playing. And when they are, I love watching. I gotta have something or someone to root for. 

 

The same goes for Halo. Did I watch any of the games during Halo 2 that were focused on no-name teams? Not really. The only games we watched were when the big name teams came on (i.e. Final Boss, Carbon, St8 Rippin, etc). 

 

So maybe you're partially right if you belong in that category of watching sports because you like the sport. But for some of us, it was definitely about the personalities and rooting for that 'home team'. 

 

I agree with this to an extent, I continued to root for Walshy after he was kicked off FB in H3 and Reach because he is from the area where I live and I thought he was a cool guy. I also rooted for Shook On3 gaming in H2 because I liked Shook On3's montages and Vegeto was just hilarious  :lol:

 

I think in Reach, when the big "e-sports boom of 2010" happened with the advent of popular streaming sites like Twitch and a new focus on user created content, alot of "established" Halo pros did not take advantage of these new trends and instead continued to operate like it was still the LAN-centric days of 2004- early 2010.

 

Players like Ninja+Mikwen that weren't known for their top 3 placings but their streaming fan-bases, became a "thing" in the Halo scene for the first time ever, and alot of veteran pros reacted negatively to the fact that popular streamers like Ninja were getting more attention than some of the established top pro teams. We also see this with the majority of the comp Halo community hating online tournaments, but there is more online tournaments than LAN tournaments for alot of the major "e-sports today" the lines are really being blurred. In the future, the comp community and Halo pros will have to adapt to these new trends and build their streaming fan-bases in order to grow the scene and reach a larger audience.

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So if T2 or Walshy were perennial top-24 talents instead of top-2, you'd still root for them?

 

You're kind of proving my point.

I still watch Gandhi and maven stream hearthstone and other games, I don't even like those games. 

 

I just like the personalities  

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I still watch Gandhi and maven stream hearthstone and other games, I don't even like those games. 

 

I just like the personalities  

 

And IF the Halo scene were filled with people like you, we wouldn't be having this problem. 

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So if T2 or Walshy were perennial top-24 talents instead of top-2, you'd still root for them?

 

You're kind of proving my point.

 

I'm still rooting for iLondon and the rest of chasing victory. This year is their year.

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Halo never had any good personalities, and the few that existed were sorta cool were far too lazy to actually care about content creation.

 

The worst part to me is that anyone on the top 4 teams could have made so much money for years, but they chose not to. Stupid kids.

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So if T2 or Walshy were perennial top-24 talents instead of top-2, you'd still root for them?

 

You're kind of proving my point.

 

Yes, I'd still root for them. How is this proving your point? I thought you said Halo wasn't built around personalities? 

 

 

The Halo community was never, ever, EVER about the same things that League, Starcraft, COD, Battlefield, etc. are about - namely, sitting around watching streams and making joke content. Those are the two things that get the most attention these days, and Halo never did that. We were into Halo because we were into the sport of it, not the culture of it. Yes, it did develop its own culture, but that culture was strictly about events and LANs. 

 

So it's no surprise that almost nobody stepped up to the plate when Halo crashed. The scene wasn't built around personalities, it was based around legendary tournament play and a bunch of guys who were convinced they could do the same thing. It was because Halo died at the wrong moment and also because it never developed in the correct way to adapt to today's gaming culture that we're seeing almost no content being put out, and probably never will. 

 

 

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But you can't wait till halo 5 to decide that you need to take advantage of spreading the halo culture. It needs to be started now. A lot of you people that are ignorant want to put it all on 343's shoulders and pray to the halo gods that they make a good game. A lot more goes into corporations investing in games then just the game being good. eSports is in a huge cash grab state where corporations and sponsors are still throwing money around trying to be involved in the next big thing. What if halo5 isn't good??? Then what??? We all will be sitting on our asses twiddling our thumbs saying "we need a good halo game". Fuck that.

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What if halo5 isn't good??? Then what??? We all will be sitting on our asses twiddling our thumbs saying "we need a good halo game". Fuck that.

Yeah the freaking Smash community did it, Why can't we? 

 

Heck, Dota didn't even had any marketing shit back then and look how big it is now. For the guys that isn't familiar to Dota it's the game that single handedly created an entire genre by itself which is the MOBA genre. Examples of this genre are Infinite Crisis, Heroes of the Storm and League of Legends. It spawned a sequel published by valve called Dota 2.

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But you can't wait till halo 5 to decide that you need to take advantage of spreading the halo culture. It needs to be started now. A lot of you people that are ignorant want to put it all on 343's shoulders and pray to the halo gods that they make a good game. A lot more goes into corporations investing in games then just the game being good. eSports is in a huge cash grab state where corporations and sponsors are still throwing money around trying to be involved in the next big thing. What if halo5 isn't good??? Then what??? We all will be sitting on our asses twiddling our thumbs saying "we need a good halo game". Fuck that.

 

This is exactly what I've been trying to say.  Regardless of how good Halo 5 is, the game itself will not just magically bring Halo back to being where it once was.  The game has to be sustainable which even during the "peak" of Halo it wasn't (we know this because MLG confirmed before that they never even started to break even until 2012 I believe).  So the Halo scene has to grow beyond that point, beyond the peak of the H2/H3 days and the only way that's really going to happen is by having personalities or an organization (OpTic) who can attract a large viewership.  And if you think Halo 5 will just drop and then players will make content and become big personalities in just a few days, it's not going to work like that.  Do you think guys like Nadeshot just became personalities overnight?  He's been doing content since 2010 and he honestly didn't have much in terms of viewership until 2 years later.  His viewership didn't really start coming about until 2012 with MW3, a game that only had UMG events (which I don't think he even competed in because he wasn't even on the OpTic pro team roster at that time, he was just a content creator for them).  So during the time of a shit game (MW3 competitive game play was pretty boring to watch) with no major events (sounds familiar?) he streamed and put up youtube videos every day and managed to significantly grow his fanbase.  He also managed to do that with 90% of his content still directed towards competitive cod (during a time when there wasn't too much interest in it). 

 

Perhaps Ninja is Halo's "Nadeshot" for instance (I use him because I see him streaming Halo every day, I even got wrecked in H3 by him the other day :/ ).  But regardless don't think there's nothing you can do until then.  You still have a year and a half pretty much until Halo 5 even releases so you have valuable time to make things happen. 

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You are right and wrong at the same time.  

 

Do I think they seriously care about the Halo community? Not really, Only a handful of pros do in my opinion.

 

On the flipside - These guys are Pro at a game, the game falls off, no more money or tournaments.  It is either try and go pro at a game that has all the money (in this case Call of Duty) or go get a job at mcdonalds.

 

I think the real issue here is this:  The game has to be good for the pros to stick around.  If no money is available to win in the space they will just follow the money to another title that they think they have a chance at.

 On point. 

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This is exactly what I've been trying to say.  Regardless of how good Halo 5 is, the game itself will not just magically bring Halo back to being where it once was.  The game has to be sustainable which even during the "peak" of Halo it wasn't (we know this because MLG confirmed before that they never even started to break even until 2012 I believe).  So the Halo scene has to grow beyond that point, beyond the peak of the H2/H3 days and the only way that's really going to happen is by having personalities or an organization (OpTic) who can attract a large viewership.  And if you think Halo 5 will just drop and then players will make content and become big personalities in just a few days, it's not going to work like that.  Do you think guys like Nadeshot just became personalities overnight?  He's been doing content since 2010 and he honestly didn't have much in terms of viewership until 2 years later.  His viewership didn't really start coming about until 2012 with MW3, a game that only had UMG events (which I don't think he even competed in because he wasn't even on the OpTic pro team roster at that time, he was just a content creator for them).  So during the time of a shit game (MW3 competitive game play was pretty boring to watch) with no major events (sounds familiar?) he streamed and put up youtube videos every day and managed to significantly grow his fanbase.  He also managed to do that with 90% of his content still directed towards competitive cod (during a time when there wasn't too much interest in it). 

 

Perhaps Ninja is Halo's "Nadeshot" for instance (I use him because I see him streaming Halo every day, I even got wrecked in H3 by him the other day :/ ).  But regardless don't think there's nothing you can do until then.  You still have a year and a half pretty much until Halo 5 even releases so you have valuable time to make things happen. 

Everyone confuses "growing your personal brand" with "growing the scene". They are not the same thing. Just putting out promotional youtube videos does not count as doing the hard work of growing the scene.

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Everyone confuses "growing your personal brand" with "growing the scene". They are not the same thing. Just putting out promotional youtube videos does not count as doing the hard work of growing the scene.

 

Growing a personal brand can directly affect the growth of the scene though if the brand revolves around e-sports.  If OpTic nor Nadeshot (or should I say at least someone willing to put in the work he did because others would probably have large brands themselves had they done the same) didn't exist, the cod e-sports wouldn't have grown to what it is now.  Of course there are other mitigating factors that helped, but ultimately had there not been the possibility of promoting cod e-sports to a much larger audience, that growth wouldn't have happened.  The same situation will happen in Halo, yes Halo 5 will generate a lot of hype and if it's a great game, millions of people will play it.  But regardless of how many people buy the game, you still have to figure out how to get more people involved in competitive Halo, more people than ever before.  So how would you do that?  You would have to create content and expose competitive Halo to a larger audience but how do you think that will happen without having people who grew a personal brand and attract a large viewerbase? 

 

 

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