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Competing at local tourneys...need advice

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Yeah, the Microsoft Store at the Florida Mall has one every Tuesday, which I go to. All except it's Team Doubles and it's double elimination. I won 2 and lost 2. But the problem I'm having is going up against players who are like 50's to a level 15 in Halo 3. I'm decent at Halo, semi-competitive, but I go by myself since the only person I know that I play doubles with online lives in another state, so I have to team up with someone else. I admit I choked tonight because of the communication being very different. However with my friend I do pretty good. Practice wise, I go into Rumble Pit and Infinity Slayer sometimes. Should I start with Team Throwdown to get better? This is the first tournament I've gone to and the last one,  a 360 slim was up for grabs for the winner and I'm fustrated I didn't win it.

 

So, how do I compete with people that are way higher then me in terms of skill? I had stopped going into Team Throwdown because I kept getting torn apart and I'm someone who likes to keep his K/D posititve. To put it in more simpler terms, it's like going to an AGL event, being a competitive player, going up against someone like Snipedown and getting stomped on. I'm not getting past 4 kills in these tournaments and I'm one who doesn't give up. So....what should I do to improve and better prepare for these tournaments?

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Yeah, the Microsoft Store at the Florida Mall has one every Tuesday, which I go to. All except it's Team Doubles and it's double elimination. I won 2 and lost 2. But the problem I'm having is going up against players who are like 50's to a level 15 in Halo 3. I'm decent at Halo, semi-competitive, but I go by myself since the only person I know that I play doubles with online lives in another state, so I have to team up with someone else. I admit I choked tonight because of the communication being very different. However with my friend I do pretty good. Practice wise, I go into Rumble Pit and Infinity Slayer sometimes. Should I start with Team Throwdown to get better? This is the first tournament I've gone to and the last one,  a 360 slim was up for grabs for the winner and I'm fustrated I didn't win it.

 

So, how do I compete with people that are way higher then me in terms of skill? I had stopped going into Team Throwdown because I kept getting torn apart and I'm someone who likes to keep his K/D posititve. To put it in more simpler terms, it's like going to an AGL event, being a competitive player, going up against someone like Snipedown and getting stomped on. I'm not getting past 4 kills in these tournaments and I'm one who doesn't give up. So....what should I do to improve and better prepare for these tournaments?

 

Watch lots of AGL tourneys, and pro streams. Play throwdown a lot more, and try to play customs with people you meet in throwdown. 

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Watch lots of AGL tourneys, and pro streams. Play throwdown a lot more, and try to play customs with people you meet in throwdown.

This. Playing with people better than you is always the best. You learn a lot more. Just trying to peak in Slayer will only get you to the top of your game with what you CURRENTLY know. But there's always more to learn.

 

Trust me, I'm having to relearn Halo since pretty much quitting near the end of Halo 2; I played H3 very, very seldomly and only for fun on guest at a friends' place. And to hell with Reach, I pretty much just stuck to Anniversary playlist and SWAT for the most part.

 

It's tough to get stomped on regularly, but if you meet people in Throwdown who will work WITH you, you can pick up tricks, strategy, and get out of your own "zone" and into a better one the more you play. It takes a lot of practice and time so just stick with it.

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Watch lots of AGL tourneys, and pro streams. Play throwdown a lot more, and try to play customs with people you meet in throwdown. 

 

 

This. Playing with people better than you is always the best. You learn a lot more. Just trying to peak in Slayer will only get you to the top of your game with what you CURRENTLY know. But there's always more to learn.

 

Trust me, I'm having to relearn Halo since pretty much quitting near the end of Halo 2; I played H3 very, very seldomly and only for fun on guest at a friends' place. And to hell with Reach, I pretty much just stuck to Anniversary playlist and SWAT for the most part.

 

It's tough to get stomped on regularly, but if you meet people in Throwdown who will work WITH you, you can pick up tricks, strategy, and get out of your own "zone" and into a better one the more you play. It takes a lot of practice and time so just stick with it.

Both have really good advice. Remember, you learn more losing in Throwdown than you do winning in Slayer. Go back and watch some of your own matches. Learn what you did wrong, and get better from it.

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What settings are being used?  

 

Find out about other local players there.  Local events can be used to get new friends to play Halo with (they aren't just for competing) and you can maybe team with them in the future. Talk to your teammates and see what your problems are as a team.

 

Do not, do not get flustered in tournaments.  I go to fighting tournaments weekly and man I get flustered so much in games and it REALLY messes me up.  i do bad decisions, cant do my inputs right at all, etc and it just fucks me up in matches way too much that I can count.  The more you go to events though the less this happens to you and eventually you can be calm at events and work well under pressure 

 

Time yo weapons 

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Grind out a 50 in Rumble Pit. It takes a long time, took me about 194 games, but once I did it, I could hit every single shot, easily, 5 a person 80% of the time. Do that, and you'll get immense confidence in your skill. After that, your individual skill will plateau. Everything in terms of skill progression after that is team based.

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If you're looking to improve in an individual aspect, like say getting your shot on or hitting constant snipes I would strongly recommend going into Rumble Pit and playing an immense amount of FFA's. These are most useful because they teach you how to shoot under pressure and keep your composure when you're losing as well as learning angles where you can take cover from shots while shooting somebody else.

 

Otherwise, if you want to improve working with whomever on a team I would strongly recommend finding some people that you can run customs with for at least two hours. This will put you in a highly competitive environment and you must learn to communicate and position yourself accordingly to what you hear being called out from your teammates and will ultimately improve your teamwork.

 

Another tip that I have for you is to always time the power weapons and over-shields on maps, as the team that can acquire more of them will usually end up on top. 

 

Hopefully this helps,

-Inversion

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Wow, thanks guys!! I'll put this advice to good use, To be quite honest, I didn't even know about the rewattching your matches after you played them, Ninja did it on one of his streams, but I never realized good came out of that. I learn something everyday from this community :)

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if i was you i would try and get some people you could team with a grind it out on throwdown.. at the start you will loose some but playing against higher players will actually make you better so i would do that! also if you want as some extra is watch some pro gameplays and watch what they do and try and learn off that too! hope this helps :D

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You can go to a local every Tuesday?? Lucky!

 

Seems like everyone else already answered your questions though  :)

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Yeah, the Microsoft Store at the Florida Mall has one every Tuesday, which I go to. All except it's Team Doubles and it's double elimination. I won 2 and lost 2. But the problem I'm having is going up against players who are like 50's to a level 15 in Halo 3. I'm decent at Halo, semi-competitive, but I go by myself since the only person I know that I play doubles with online lives in another state, so I have to team up with someone else. I admit I choked tonight because of the communication being very different. However with my friend I do pretty good. Practice wise, I go into Rumble Pit and Infinity Slayer sometimes. Should I start with Team Throwdown to get better? This is the first tournament I've gone to and the last one,  a 360 slim was up for grabs for the winner and I'm fustrated I didn't win it.

 

So, how do I compete with people that are way higher then me in terms of skill? I had stopped going into Team Throwdown because I kept getting torn apart and I'm someone who likes to keep his K/D posititve. To put it in more simpler terms, it's like going to an AGL event, being a competitive player, going up against someone like Snipedown and getting stomped on. I'm not getting past 4 kills in these tournaments and I'm one who doesn't give up. So....what should I do to improve and better prepare for these tournaments?

 

First of all. 

 

 

I had stopped going into Team Throwdown because I kept getting torn apart and I'm someone who likes to keep his K/D posititve.

 

Failing constantly helps you more than you might realize. 

 

The best way to learn how to succeed is to learn how to decrypt your own failures. In all likelihood, you are failing not because of your technical skill (shot, strafe, etc.), but because of your mental game. Here is my general advice for getting better at Halo:

 

1. Accept death. You will never get out of a tournament game with zero deaths. Stop looking at death as a failure, and start looking at it as a natural consequence for doing what needs to be done during the course of the game. If you push, you might die - that's okay. Learn when to realize that death is out of your control, and you'll suddenly find that you are much more in control of when you die than you think. Not only will this prevent you from getting frustrated, it will help you perform under pressure. 

 

2. Learn to "see" the whole map. See your teammates? That is everywhere that the enemy is not. You have to learn to feel out the enemy locations (learning the spawn system, as well as exploring every cranny of the maps, is huge in this), and that will make you a much better positional player, which is 80% of Halo. If the gametypes you're playing have sprint or instant respawn in them, then this kind of messes things up and there's little that you can do about it. 

 

3. Don't assume that you need to constantly be advancing to apply pressure to the other team. Sometimes waiting is the key to outsmarting your opponent - balance this with the need for good teamshot in Halo. Never let your teammates pressure you. Do what you feel is the right approach, while being mindful to support your players. "Fucking push up, stop standing there" is the hallmark of an idiot Halo player. You will not get all the way across the map in one shove, especially in Halo 4. 

 

4. Learn to coordinate your strafe with your enemy's shot, and use the terrain to your advantage. This requires a lot of practice, but use your own experiences about players shaking you off target - what caused you to lose your aim? Abuse power positions that make you hard to follow, such as ramps and areas with clutter. Predict your enemy's movements, for example, when your opponent decides to throw a grenade. 

 

5. Watch your own films (preferably in scrimmages with dedicated 4s or 2s). You'll learn a lot about why you're getting outclassed. 

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