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Simplicityyy

Are people growing tired of open world design?

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I have come up with the idea that from the great many comments on YouTube and places around the internet that gamers are growing fatigued from large, open world games. Even if the story and world are amazing, like an Elder Scrolls experience, Assassins Creed, and more recently Horizon Zero Dawn. For me, I like them. Also I like games that have a degree of linearity, but not so linear (cough *Uncharted * cough... ;) ) that they force you to progress and not explore your surroundings much. Even if its just gazing at the gorgeous landscape. So, me being someone who wants to write game stories and in game lore - all that good stuff, or more accurately simply wants to work on games, what kinds of level and world design do you want to play? I have a game story idea I'm slowly expanding on. However, its hard to decide if I want it to be a linear-ish action adventure, or an open world. I will have to write more of it to figure that out.

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i like open world games where the side quests either tie into the main story or open up the lore of the world. for example, though i loved the witcher 3, many side quest on the boards felt super repetitive (walk along way tracking ___, fight monster, return) to the point where they wrote in jokes with Geralt making some comment about how we always have to do this. there were great side quests but most tied into this. with something like the later mass effects, a lot of side quests sent you to a new part of the map and gave you insights and interactions that were worth the trip. dont get me wrong there was plenty of repetitiveness there too but optional loyalty quests and such are experiences i wouldnt miss even if i can choose not to do them

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i like open world games where the side quests either tie into the main story or open up the lore of the world. 

That's what Horizon Zero Dawn is like. I'm 20 hours in, and I keep finding more and more goodies that propel the narrative forward, help you gain better gear, and flesh out the beautiful world Guerrilla crafted.

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I have been fatigued of gaming since the last 2 years and it's scaring me. I couldn't get through linear games, and open world games are even worse (there's too much shit to do). 

 

 

But what did grab my attention is the new zelda. 

There's so much to explore, but the amount of side quest isn't too much. It's not like one town would give you hoards and hoards of side quests, they focused more on the exploration. Yeah there are side quests, but i would encounter once every so often that it doesn't overwhelm me. 

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@@lofike Perhaps the game industry has plateaued? We have too many similar experiences and not enough risk for experimentation. I think if you forget about the genre or style of game you play and just enjoy it, you wouldn't need to worry about it. 

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Too much to talk about with this topic and I can't jot it all down in a way that I find satisfactory so I'll just leave you with some loosely assembled thoughts to consider or challenge.

 

You might as well be asking if I prefer Forks to Spoons.  Some games are better suited to an open world format and some are not.  Being open world might be contributing to flaws that lead me to hate a specific game, but I don't hate games just for being open world.  That said if you're making your game open world (or..not open world) it should be because it fits some design goal you have in mind, not just for the sake of following a fad.  Otherwise you run the risk of ruining your game by having the world design conflict with the game mechanics or game direction (imagine for example if Portal was an open world game).

 

I would say it's definitely possible for open world games to ultimately be less interesting than linear or semi-linear ones.  Mainly because a lot of them can basically be generalized as:

 

1.  Take the campaign levels from a linear game, shrink them down to a quarter of their size, and greatly simplify their layout.

2.  Throw all of those neutered levels onto a grid.

3.  Fill in the blank space of that grid with a ton of thoughtlessly generated, similar-looking landscape that serves no real purpose other than to connect the levels and look pretty.

4.  Have missions that force people to revisit these (relatively speaking) dumbed down levels over and over again.

5.  Give people the option to fast travel over the landscape because you're self-aware of how shallow it is.

6.  Congratulations, you've made Fallout.

 

That's not true of all open world games though.  Games like crackdown and sunset overdrive manage to have every bit of geometry serve an actual gameplay purpose as well as be fun to traverse, while Dark Souls 1 mostly avoids the dilemma I mentioned earlier by being 90% complete, thought out levels connected together seamlessly instead of being 90% landscape connecting a handful of small dungeons, all the while still managing to be very scenic.

 

I guess what I'm trying to say is that the quality of the world itself and how exactly the world relates to gameplay are major things to consider here.

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Too much to talk about with this topic and I can't jot it all down in a way that I find satisfactory so I'll just leave you with some loosely assembled thoughts to consider or challenge.

 

You might as well be asking if I prefer Forks to Spoons.  Some games are better suited to an open world format and some are not.  Being open world might be contributing to flaws that lead me to hate a specific game, but I don't hate games just for being open world.  That said if you're making your game open world (or..not open world) it should be because it fits some design goal you have in mind, not just for the sake of following a fad.  Otherwise you run the risk of ruining your game by having the world design conflict with the game mechanics or game direction (imagine for example if Portal was an open world game).

 

I would say it's definitely possible for open world games to ultimately be less interesting than linear or semi-linear ones.  Mainly because a lot of them can basically be generalized as:

 

1.  Take the campaign levels from a linear game, shrink them down to a quarter of their size, and greatly simplify their layout.

2.  Throw all of those neutered levels onto a grid.

3.  Fill in the blank space of that grid with a ton of thoughtlessly generated, similar-looking landscape that serves no real purpose other than to connect the levels and look pretty.

4.  Have missions that force people to revisit these (relatively speaking) dumbed down levels over and over again.

5.  Give people the option to fast travel over the landscape because you're self-aware of how shallow it is.

6.  Congratulations, you've made Fallout.

 

That's not true of all open world games though.  Games like crackdown and sunset overdrive manage to have every bit of geometry serve an actual gameplay purpose as well as be fun to traverse, while Dark Souls 1 mostly avoids the dilemma I mentioned earlier by being 90% complete, thought out levels connected together seamlessly instead of being 90% landscape connecting a handful of small dungeons, all the while still managing to be very scenic.

 

I guess what I'm trying to say is that the quality of the world itself and how exactly the world relates to gameplay are major things to consider here.

You got me at #6 = Fallout. Hehe. I haven't played Fallout, so I only know so much from what I've been told. I agree entirely with you. 

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