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VinnyMendoza

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Still looks rough. Simple lighting, clunky animations, reliance on text boxes over voice acting...

 

Oblivion is in another galaxy in these aspects.

Oblivion just looks generic and dull. Sure, the animations are stable, and graphics and lighting were improved, but each race looked abnormal and ugly, the aesthetics were unimpressive at the time, and everything just looked too bright (then again, the Xbox 360 was known for excessive bright games during its early life stages). I prefer text boxes over bad voice acting.

 

 

But sadly, its aged the worst out of the group.

Little to no voice acting, TONS of dialogue (not so much a problem for me, but can be for some)

Graphics aged horribly (has gotten a ton better due to modding)

No fast travel (can be tedious, but I actually enjoyed it)

Easily exploitable from fortifying skills to never come down or just jumping on a rock and bowing Umbra down because he can't find a way up.

 

-If people cannot be bothered to actually read in a video game, then I do not understand how it is the fault of the game.

-Graphics should never be a indicator on how badly a game has aged, especially if it is an early 3-D Open-World Game.

-In a way, Morrowind did have multiple forms of transportation which could take the player from one village/city to another; I do not found it con, nor tedious to have the player encouraged to explore world. IIRC, that has always been the selling point of the series.

-To be fair, it was a pretty fun glitch.

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Oblivion just looks generic and dull. Sure, the animations are stable, and graphics and lighting were improved, but each race looked abnormal and ugly, the aesthetics were unimpressive at the time, and everything just looked too bright (then again, the Xbox 360 was known for excessive bright games during its early life stages). I prefer text boxes over bad voice acting.

Generic, maybe. Dull? I think you mean beautiful, tranquil, immersive. And the planes of Oblivion are pretty intense.

 

Ugly characters? Maybe, but they look good on a pure technical level.

 

The brightness is part of the art style. It plus the (admittedly slightly excessive) bloom give the game a heavenly aura. Skyrim's building interiors have the same look.

 

I've never heard world-class voice acting in a video game. What's there (and in Skyrim) is plenty acceptable. And Oblivion gave us the gift of:

 

 

-If people cannot be bothered to actually read in a video game, then I do not understand how it is the fault of the game.

-Graphics should never be a indicator on how badly a game has aged, especially if it is an early 3-D Open-World Game.

-In a way, Morrowind did have multiple forms of transportation which could take the player from one village/city to another; I do not found it con, nor tedious to have the player encouraged to explore world. IIRC, that has always been the selling point of the series.

-To be fair, it was a pretty fun glitch.

Reading the books in TES is great fun. But voice acting helps carry the plot far better than text.

 

Morrowind isn't early 3D. Compare it to other games on the original Xbox:

 

 

But in any case, after playing Oblivion, anything with less technical oomph looks like sludge:

 

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Oblivion just looks generic and dull. Sure, the animations are stable, and graphics and lighting were improved, but each race looked abnormal and ugly, the aesthetics were unimpressive at the time, and everything just looked too bright (then again, the Xbox 360 was known for excessive bright games during its early life stages). I prefer text boxes over bad voice acting.

The bolded is my problem with Oblivion. I haven't played it since its initial release, but I remember everything pretty much looking the same. Don't get me wrong, a TON of Morrowind is red sand and cliff racers, but it also had a lot of diversity between its Dwemer ruins, the crazy plant life in Zafirbel Bay, the plains of the Grazelands, and Vivecs ocean town. Maybe I just didn't put enough time into Oblivion, but nothing stood out to me.

 

 

-If people cannot be bothered to actually read in a video game, then I do not understand how it is the fault of the game.

-Graphics should never be a indicator on how badly a game has aged, especially if it is an early 3-D Open-World Game.

-In a way, Morrowind did have multiple forms of transportation which could take the player from one village/city to another; I do not found it con, nor tedious to have the player encouraged to explore world. IIRC, that has always been the selling point of the series.

-To be fair, it was a pretty fun glitch.

-I'm just stating as to why some might dislike it compared to the rest of the series.

-Some people do care about graphics. Pixel games are fun because you are looking past the graphics to enjoy it. But these are just bad textures in general.

-I loved the fact that you just couldn't fast warp everywhere, but again with the first part, its become apart of the series and some could dislike it due to that fact.

- :lol:

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I put so many hours into Morrowind. I didn't think much of Oblivion and Skyrim - just explored 100% of the map and completed the main quest.

 

Don't put much thought into this poll. A giant chunk of the people who played Morrowind don't follow games anymore. Most who are voting have never played a game that released before CoD4 introduced them to gaming.

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Generic, maybe. Dull? I think you mean beautiful, tranquil, immersive. And the planes of Oblivion are pretty intense.

 

Ugly characters? Maybe, but they look good on a pure technical level.

 

The brightness is part of the art style. It plus the (admittedly slightly excessive) bloom give the game a heavenly aura. Skyrim's building interiors have the same look.

 

I've never heard world-class voice acting in a video game. What's there (and in Skyrim) is plenty acceptable. And Oblivion gave us the gift of:

 

 

 

Reading the books in TES is great fun. But voice acting helps carry the plot far better than text.

 

Morrowind isn't early 3D. Compare it to other games on the original Xbox:

 

 

But in any case, after playing Oblivion, anything with less technical oomph looks like sludge:

 

I will not deny some parts of the game looked beautiful, and the Imperial City and some towns like Skingrad seemed peaceful, but immersive? The land of Cyrodiil lacked too much distinction between regions to be immersive, and I felt disappointed in how the planes of Oblivion were depicted; they could have had a much grittier, more hellish look to them, they should have had their own soundtrack instead of the typical tracks you would hear in dungeons and caves, and again, the brightness did not fit the atmosphere of them.

 

Are you sure about that?

 

I like the way Morrowind handled its art style better. It felt like a foreign world, while Cyrodiil and Skyrim are based on already established settings in human history. I guess it makes sense, due to the fact that both of them are human homelands.

 

Voice-acting in a video game does not need to the GOAT, but it needs to convey emotion to a certain degree in certain situations and moments. The voice cast in Oblivion and Skyrim sounded bored most of the time and just read their lines so they could all call it day and move on.

 

If the voice-acting is good enough (such as this, for instance), then I agree. However, if the voice-acting is mediocre, then it is not going keep the story interesting, at least to me. I like reading text boxes because it gives me possibilities of what the person I am speaking to might sound like, which adds to immersion in my opinion, especially if the dialogue is relevant to the story.

 

I called Morrowind as such because it is a PC-based 3-D RPG; games like it were uncommon during its time. It might not be an early 3-D game. Fable is not good example because it was design solely for consoles, and to be quite, is not an RPG in any sense of the word, but rather a fun two-hour Hack 'n' Slash game.

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I will not deny some parts of the game looked beautiful, and the Imperial City and some towns like Skingrad seemed peaceful, but immersive? The land of Cyrodiil lacked too much distinction between regions to be immersive, and I felt disappointed in how the planes of Oblivion were depicted; they could have had a much grittier, more hellish look to them, they should have had their own soundtrack instead of the typical tracks you would hear in dungeons and caves, and again, the brightness did not fit the atmosphere of them.

 

Are you sure about that?

 

I like the way Morrowind handled its art style better. It felt like a foreign world, while Cyrodiil and Skyrim are based on already established settings in human history. I guess it makes sense, due to the fact that both of them are human homelands.

I agree that the planes of Oblivion could've been a bit grittier, but it was the little things in them that I loved. Blood fountains, corpses in cages, flesh pods, "churls", Rending Halls, the winding map design, etc.

 

The ambient tracks in Oblivion are great. Skyrim's in comparison are just kinda...there.

 

Those race comparisons aren't very good. It's custom vs. custom (the pre-built NPCs in both games look far better), plus the Skyrim models have more favorable lighting. The Khajiit and Orcs definitely look better in Skyrim, though (beasts need lots of detail to look good).

 

Always I hear that Cyrodiil is bad because it's not foreign enough. So what? For an environment based for the most part on the real world, it's very inviting. Those forests, those fields, those seas, those mountains...it feels like somewhere I'd want to live out my life.

 

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What is undertale?

 

Hmmm, how to explain...

 

An "RPG" that challenges and pokes fun at tropes of that genre.  Mainly that the people you encounter are more than just a free source of experience points, and you're encouraged to figure out how to spare them (of course you can still also play the game like a sociopath if you choose).  Mixed in with a pretty heartwarming atmosphere, amazing OST and some very meta commentary and game mechanics (ex. the game will actually remember and comment on some things you did between saves and playthroughs), and it's one of my favorites of all time.

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