Jump to content
MultiLockOn

How to Design a Halo Map

Recommended Posts

Forger's should definitely be open minded to possibilities and the potential of their map. They shouldn't try to force the map to be something it isn't trying to be, nor should they conform to "popular standards" of other maps. If everyone is making an asymmetrical room based map, that doesn't mean you can't make a symmetrical atrium map and vice versa. There is no right or wrong map layout.

 

Nevertheless, saying there are "no rules" gives Forgers an excuse to be lazy and uneducated. You don't have ramps more than a certain angle for the same reason you don't make ceilings too low, spawns facing walls or place Blue Team's flag 3 feet away from Red Team's flag. Forging is an art, but map design is a skill. Skills require knowledge of fundamentals and tuning over time, and the map is very unlikely to play well if the creator doesn't understand those fundamentals. 

 

It is indeed easy to spot a Forger with a breadth of knowledge and experience of a variety of maps as opposed to somebody with limited experience. The former is more likely to create an original design while the latter may stick to what they know and iterate on a map they like. Neither are improper approaches to design, but both require the creator to have a solid foundation from which to build on. Once a designer becomes comfortable with that, they may very well break them where appropriate.

 

Otherwise, we ought not to be encouraging Forgers to hide Sniper Rifles on floating platforms outside their maps. 

  • Upvote (+1) 2

Share this post


Link to post

"Do what ever you want, just make sure it works..."

 

 

Your video doesnt teach them what works, or why something works. Your video doesn't teach anything about forging. Instead of teaching how to forge, it preaches why one should forge anything they want to forge. 

Share this post


Link to post

"Do what ever you want, just make sure it works..."

 

 

Your video doesnt teach them what works, or why something works. Your video doesn't teach anything about forging. Instead of teaching how to forge, it preaches why one should forge anything they want to forge. 

This is the first episode...? I assume this is just a starting point for the rest of his videos, and I think he's making a very good point. The forge community likes to constrict what is "acceptable", and he's starting off by saying that anything can go, assuming you pull it off properly. Does he address what "properly" is, well, no. But again, I assume that's something he's going to do in the future.

  • Upvote (+1) 2

Share this post


Link to post

Forger's should definitely be open minded to possibilities and the potential of their map. They shouldn't try to force the map to be something it isn't trying to be, nor should they conform to "popular standards" of other maps. If everyone is making an asymmetrical room based map, that doesn't mean you can't make a symmetrical atrium map and vice versa. There is no right or wrong map layout.

 

Nevertheless, saying there are "no rules" gives Forgers an excuse to be lazy and uneducated. You don't have ramps more than a certain angle for the same reason you don't make ceilings too low, spawns facing walls or place Blue Team's flag 3 feet away from Red Team's flag. Forging is an art, but map design is a skill. Skills require knowledge of fundamentals and tuning over time, and the map is very unlikely to play well if the creator doesn't understand those fundamentals. 

 

It is indeed easy to spot a Forger with a breadth of knowledge and experience of a variety of maps as opposed to somebody with limited experience. The former is more likely to create an original design while the latter may stick to what they know and iterate on a map they like. Neither are improper approaches to design, but both require the creator to have a solid foundation from which to build on. Once a designer becomes comfortable with that, they may very well break them where appropriate.

 

Otherwise, we ought not to be encouraging Forgers to hide Sniper Rifles on floating platforms outside their maps. 

 

Are you serious.  The whole "No Rules" thing is really just a catchphrase for the episode, don't take it literally.  I make a lot of black and white statements in the video "Lockout could be the best/worst map ever, never listen to someone who tells you you're wrong etc." that obviously should not be taken at face value.  I thought this was more than apparent but you've obviously taken it very literally.  I'm not gonna sit here and pretend like if someone wants to put 9 rockets on a map that's the size of a 5v5 block then that's okay, because that's idiotic.  The video may not come off correctly to you but I think it strikes a different note in the forging community.  Lots of stigmas floating around about map design and whatnot.

 

"Do what ever you want, just make sure it works..."

 

 

Your video doesnt teach them what works, or why something works. Your video doesn't teach anything about forging. Instead of teaching how to forge, it preaches why one should forge anything they want to forge. 

 

Again, I'm not sure why you're taking that at face value.

 

But this is the first episode of 8, and I wanted to begin with this before I began explaining different ways to go about verticality, or pathing, or building a map for certain player counts, because I felt this was a strong precedent for all of those.  For the record, I have every episode already scripted.  I even say in the beginning of the video "Before I get into x and x and x and x "

 

This is the first episode...? I assume this is just a starting point for the rest of his videos, and I think he's making a very good point. The forge community likes to constrict what is "acceptable", and he's starting off by saying that anything can go, assuming you pull it off properly. Does he address what "properly" is, well, no. But again, I assume that's something he's going to do in the future.

 

Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post

Are you serious.  The whole "No Rules" thing is really just a catchphrase for the episode, don't take it literally.  I make a lot of black and white statements in the video "Lockout could be the best/worst map ever, never listen to someone who tells you you're wrong etc." that obviously should not be taken at face value.  I thought this was more than apparent but you've obviously taken it very literally.  I'm not gonna sit here and pretend like if someone wants to put 9 rockets on a map that's the size of a 5v5 block then that's okay, because that's idiotic.  The video may not come off correctly to you but I think it strikes a different note in the forging community.  Lots of stigmas floating around about map design and whatnot.

 

 

I took the video subject literally because you spent most of it deviating from your point, which I interpreted as "think outside the box". However, instead of emphasizing this point, you went on and on about how bad you think Lockout is. 

 

If I misinterpreted that point, then I find the video all the more confusing and fail to understand its purpose. For the first episode of a series, it is good to remind Forgers that there are other styles of maps out there and they should be open to exploration. However, if somebody is watching this series with the intention of understanding how to design maps, they probably aren't going to appreciate your unfiltered opinions as the sole source of instruction (which it was here) unless you have some massive credibility to back it up. I agreed with most of what you said and still felt like I was being talked down to.

 

Part of the reason the Forge community has stagnated is because everyone thinks being able to rub two blocks together makes them a hotshot. If you want to encourage Forgers to break the stale mold, then I'd also like to see you break the attitude. A montage of random forge maps juxtaposed with your own doesn't tell me anything, especially because some of the authors of those maps might feel the same if the shoe were on the other foot. 

 

As I posted on FH, I disagree that the player shouldn't be able to understand a map after your first game. Nobody outside the Forge community really cares for Forge maps, so it is the Forger's responsibility to make their map readible and accessible. We do not all have the luxury of our maps being played over and over by the same people until they are in matchmaking, so if we get a group of 8 people together, we need to capture their attention in the first ten minutes (hell, if a map doesn't look good to me in the first three, I'll probably leave). That doesn't mean you have to reveal all of the map's metagame to the player, but rather that they shouldn't be wondering where everything is while they're being spawn trapped on the bottom. Reading a map is not the same as "learning" it. 

Share this post


Link to post

@@Goat

 

I wanted to emphasize that map design is subjective so it's okay to do something different.  I said this very early on in the video.  Then went to compare Lockout to Damnation.  Both maps were considered of being the best of their respective generations despite being philosophically opposite of one another.  Then I bring it back around to show that some people have different styles.  Then I compare forge maps to to the dev maps.

 

I made a claim.

I gave an example of something that backed up my claim.

Then I reiterate my claim, and proved my claim by showing maps from the community.

 

I didn't want it to come off like a Lockout/Guardian ranting video, I just wanted to use them as an example because they're fairly popular maps that everyone can relate to.  If why I included them wasn't clear then maybe that's my fault for not making that more apparent for you.

 

And yes, it's part of a series.  The idea is that someone may watch this to serve as a precedent, before seeing episodes 2, 3, 4, all the way to 8 in the related videos sidebar and watching what they want.  Obviously I'm not able to upload them all at the same time so it just made sense to me to upload this first.  I honestly attempted to remain respectful and word everything in a way that got my point across with grace but again, if you felt like you were being talked down to then maybe that's my fault. And for the record, I don't have a degree in art or map design, just like everyone else within the forging community my credibility lies in my maps, how long I've forged, my word, whatever you want it to be.  Whether or not you think you're able to listen to me is a decision you'll have to make.
 

 

Part of the reason the Forge community has stagnated is because everyone thinks being able to rub two blocks together makes them a hotshot. If you want to encourage Forgers to break the stale mold, then I'd also like to see you break the attitude. A montage of random forge maps juxtaposed with your own doesn't tell me anything, especially because some of the authors of those maps might feel the same if the shoe were on the other foot.

 

 

Honestly I'm not even sure what you're saying here.
 

 

As I posted on FH, I disagree that the player shouldn't be able to understand a map after your first game. Nobody outside the Forge community really cares for Forge maps, so it is the Forger's responsibility to make their map readible and accessible. We do not all have the luxury of our maps being played over and over by the same people until they are in matchmaking, so if we get a group of 8 people together, we need to capture their attention in the first ten minutes (hell, if a map doesn't look good to me in the first three, I'll probably leave). That doesn't mean you have to reveal all of the map's metagame to the player, but rather that they shouldn't be wondering where everything is while they're being spawn trapped on the bottom. Reading a map is not the same as "learning" it.

 

 

And I agree? If you don't think I believe a map should be readable then my comment in the video wasn't intended for you.  Because over the past few months I've played on fairly simple maps and had people complain that some things still aren't perfectly apparent to them.  Sort of like if someone played Prisoner the first time complained that they didn't know which ramp to take to the top.

Share this post


Link to post

@@Goat

 

I wanted to emphasize that map design is subjective so it's okay to do something different.  I said this very early on in the video.  Then went to compare Lockout to Damnation.  Both maps were considered of being the best of their respective generations despite being philosophically opposite of one another.  Then I bring it back around to show that some people have different styles.  Then I compare forge maps to to the dev maps.

 

This is good for a first episode on paper, but I found that message in the video was lost behind your opinions of Lockout and the players who like that map. The example you used is fine, but the way you presented it tonally came across as pretentious to me. (The line "I could come up with an argument that is logistically sound in everyway and still fail to convince somebody." in particular was redundant to the previous 5 minutes of the video.)

 

And again, you used a montage of random maps to contrast with your own design. I'm not speaking to the quality of any of the maps shown in the video; nevertheless, I felt that it misconstrued your message, as if to say "These maps suck, but I can't convince people of that so it's okay to build them." That is obviously not your point, but the video makes it look that way. My comment about other Forgers references the fact that everyone wants to believe they're making great maps and you very clearly put yours on display at the end of the video while passively dissing the others. 

 

I'm not bothered by opinions - hell, I think 90% of Halo's maps aren't good - but the way you communicate them makes a tremendous difference in the way people soak in the information.

 

Of course, this could very well be your style of commentary. Some people appreciate that raw tone and will follow your work for that reason. For me personally, it turns me away. 

Share this post


Link to post

This is good for a first episode on paper, but I found that message in the video was lost behind your opinions of Lockout and the players who like that map. The example you used is fine, but the way you presented it tonally came across as pretentious to me. (The line "I could come up with an argument that is logistically sound in everyway and still fail to convince somebody." in particular was redundant to the previous 5 minutes of the video.)

 

And again, you used a montage of random maps to contrast with your own design. I'm not speaking to the quality of any of the maps shown in the video; nevertheless, I felt that it misconstrued your message, as if to say "These maps suck, but I can't convince people of that so it's okay to build them." That is obviously not your point, but the video makes it look that way. My comment about other Forgers references the fact that everyone wants to believe they're making great maps and you very clearly put yours on display at the end of the video while passively dissing the others. 

 

I'm not bothered by opinions - hell, I think 90% of Halo's maps aren't good - but the way you communicate them makes a tremendous difference in the way people soak in the information.

 

Of course, this could very well be your style of commentary. Some people appreciate that raw tone and will follow your work for that reason. For me personally, it turns me away. 

 

It's interesting you bring up that quote "I could come up with an argument that is logistically sound in everyway and still fail to convince somebody." because I had never even given that a second thought.  It's things like that which get me in trouble lol I'm pretty blunt in real life.  So it probably translates to the commentary as well.  I had tried pretty hard to remain civil when recording it but lines like that I hadn't even given a second thought to regarding how it might come off to some people, so I guess that's just something I'll have to work on.

 

Regarding the redundancy.. well that's just somewhat necessary I suppose to make sure I get my point across to the widest audience possible.  I mean even you're telling me I didn't incorporate the whole Lockout/Guardian speech too well (which is fair, because you're not the only one to say that) so I don't know if I could really afford to be less redundant, I think reiterating points over and over again helps sometimes otherwise the bigger message is weakened. BDobbins does this a lot and I've seen quite a bit mixed responses to his commentaries so I suppose it's just preference. 

 

As for my map being at the end.  I was literally just out of footage to use and needed something to fill that last few seconds.  The only other forge gameplay I have on my hard drive is of my maps so I just picked one.  Didn't intend it to come off as "This is the pinnacle of map design", honestly.

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post

It's interesting you bring up that quote "I could come up with an argument that is logistically sound in everyway and still fail to convince somebody." because I had never even given that a second thought.  It's things like that which get me in trouble lol I'm pretty blunt in real life.  So it probably translates to the commentary as well.  I had tried pretty hard to remain civil when recording it but lines like that I hadn't even given a second thought to regarding how it might come off to some people, so I guess that's just something I'll have to work on.

 

Regarding the redundancy.. well that's just somewhat necessary I suppose to make sure I get my point across to the widest audience possible.  I mean even you're telling me I didn't incorporate the whole Lockout/Guardian speech too well (which is fair, because you're not the only one to say that) so I don't know if I could really afford to be less redundant, I think reiterating points over and over again helps sometimes otherwise the bigger message is weakened. BDobbins does this a lot and I've seen quite a bit mixed responses to his commentaries so I suppose it's just preference. 

 

As for my map being at the end.  I was literally just out of footage to use and needed something to fill that last few seconds.  The only other forge gameplay I have on my hard drive is of my maps so I just picked one.  Didn't intend it to come off as "This is the pinnacle of map design", honestly.

 

I appreciate the honesty. Perhaps I read too far into it. 

 

Again, I agreed with most of your points and your production value is solid, so it could end up being a value resource for designers. I'd just caution you to avoid the unnecessary pitfall of ambiguity. Sometimes the best way to drive a point home isn't through repetition, but through one clean strike. Give the viewer exactly what they want to know in as few words as possible - and as always, be mindful of your tone. I listened to some of my stream archives and ended up having to change the way I talk. I sounded annoyed when I was giving callouts in my normal voice - I didn't even want to listen to myself, lol. 

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post

But having said all that, the title suggests you will be teaching how to forge. But it didn't do that. It was literally- and I mean literally- a commentary on attitudes of forgers. You went overboard on your point to make this simply an introduction.

 

I guess what I am trying to say is you could have made your point in less than a minute and it could have been a good intro to something substantial.

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post

Almost everything we do in life is 90% mental.  Forging is no different. 

The mechanical/functional part of forge accounts for all of about 1% of what makes a map, and therefore it doesn't merit any attention unless the information is aimed at someone who's fairly new to forge.

 

A persons attitude and mental approach play a vital part in determining the end product.  Some of the mental aspects of forge have been widely discussed.  For example, an understanding of things like elevation, pathing/flow, aesthetics/art, scaling, etc. is almost a necessity if someone hopes to make a 'good' map.  Most forge guides rightfully focus on these subjects.

 

However, there are other mental/emotional subjects that are equally important, but largely neglected (for whatever reason).

- "What is my end goal?" - Big picture questions such as these are often overlooked.  Without this, a forger isn't much more likely to make something 'good' than the 2 year old that's stacking Lego's on top of each other haphazardly.

- Disregarding feedback because you're emotionally invested in the current state of your map is another frequent hurdle.  This is where emotions can actually prevent you from ever making a good map, even if you 'get' all of the other important aspects of forge.

 

Those are just a couple of examples.  A person could legitimately dedicate an entire guide to how a persons mental/emotional approach can impact their map.  I would actually consider that to be 'advanced', rather than 'introductory', information since it's largely aimed at people that are already familiar with both the building and designing aspects.  A persons attitude towards design 'rules' would fall into the category of neglected subjects which I mentioned earlier.  I'm happy to see that aspect discussed in any form.

  • Upvote (+1) 4

Share this post


Link to post

Almost everything we do in life is 90% mental. Forging is no different.

The mechanical/functional part of forge accounts for all of about 1% of what makes a map, and therefore it doesn't merit any attention unless the information is aimed at someone who's fairly new to forge.

 

A persons attitude and mental approach play a vital part in determining the end product. Some of the mental aspects of forge have been widely discussed. For example, an understanding of things like elevation, pathing/flow, aesthetics/art, scaling, etc. is almost a necessity if someone hopes to make a 'good' map. Most forge guides rightfully focus on these subjects.

 

However, there are other mental/emotional subjects that are equally important, but largely neglected (for whatever reason).

- "What is my end goal?" - Big picture questions such as these are often overlooked. Without this, a forger isn't much more likely to make something 'good' than the 2 year old that's stacking Lego's on top of each other haphazardly.

- Disregarding feedback because you're emotionally invested in the current state of your map is another frequent hurdle. This is where emotions can actually prevent you from ever making a good map, even if you 'get' all of the other important aspects of forge.

 

Those are just a couple of examples. A person could legitimately dedicate an entire guide to how a persons mental/emotional approach can impact their map. I would actually consider that to be 'advanced', rather than 'introductory', information since it's largely aimed at people that are already familiar with both the building and designing aspects. A persons attitude towards design 'rules' would fall into the category of neglected subjects which I mentioned earlier. I'm happy to see that aspect discussed in any form.

Just the two examples you offer are so subjective that you could write a book for each one without ever getting across do this or don't do that.

 

In my level design chapter on art I get on the edge of a forgers' intent or goal with respect to how important art is or if they don't care at all about art. But I didn't want to go in depth, just point it out.

Share this post


Link to post

Just the two examples you offer are so subjective that you could write a book for each one without ever getting across do this or don't do that.

 

In my level design chapter on art I get on the edge of a forgers' intent or goal with respect to how important art is or if they don't care at all about art. But I didn't want to go in depth, just point it out.

Well yeah...that's kind of the point.  These things ARE subjective. They're subjects you can talk about, but not in terms of absolutes.  That's pretty much the point of the video.  It's not to say "don't do this or that".  It's to say "don't do this or that because somebody says you should".  It's a small, but important distinction.

 

'Do this'/'Don't do that' guides are extremely beneficial for forgers at some stages in their learning process.  What I'm talking about is going beyond that stage.  Once the do's and don'ts are fully understood, there's an opportunity to transcend them.  It's the stage where you move beyond being able to draw and into creating true art, beyond swinging a bat and into being a hitter, etc.  This is a stage that's rarely discussed in forge guides.  I enjoyed watching the video because it's one of the few times I've seen someone scratch the surface of this stage.  It would be cool to see someone do a series on Forge Philosophies, which consists of discussions on attitude and approach.

  • Upvote (+1) 5

Share this post


Link to post

<3 chunk

 

@@MrGreenWithAGun If you didn't find any value in the video then its likely that it doesn't apply to you, or you didn't understand it. I've seen many of your prior posts regarding forge/map design and youre definitely already competent in this area so the video probably came off as sort of bland and uninformative to you, which is fine because it doesn't need to apply to everyone. I think chunk explained it better than I probably could when he said it's a more mental approach to map building. I just happened to value the topic of the video more highly than I do the other topics im posting later and felt like it serves as a good precedent. I still have 7 other videos that address the more traditional topics of map design (verticality, weapon placement, pathing) but honestly after being barraged by lessons in those for years now I just don't find them as interesting to talk about. I think many people found a cool "aha!" Moment in this first episode that they might not have in the more technical ones, despite the others covering topics in greater depth. Hopefully you can find greater value in the future videos :)

Share this post


Link to post

Let's take a second here.

 

It seems as though you are pretty focused on the negative aspects Multi mentioned about Lockout. I don't understand why you're fixated on that. He explained that particular map has an extremely different playstyle than other maps, specifically Damnation. If you understand Lockouts playstyle, then you understand it is bad. The majority of the map is not fully utilized every game, there are strange POV sight lines, and tactical jumps that are so insane it breaks the intended flow of the map. However, it is all these flaws that gives the map such a nostalgic love. Players love these flaws because it requires map knowledge. You have to have played the map repeatedly in order to fully grasp all the things that allow you to control the map and win the match. This leads into "fully understanding the map on the first match." There is no reason you should have to fully understand the map on your first play through. In fact I would consider that a bad thing. It means your map is very simplistic, and most likely does not have any depth. A vanilla map. This leads to less replay value because it means there is nothing about the map that promotes a different strategy. This is the biggest problem in the forge community. People are over-simplifying their maps to be a "catch-all" map that anyone can play. This is the reason many people like you consider forge maps to be jokes. Halo 3 was the most iconic period for forge because people pushed the envelope. Many think reach was the pinnacle but that is a common mistake. In Reach people became dependent on rotation snap, coordinates, and in Halo 4 even magnets. These are great tools for beginners to better grasp map making, but it is something that should be progressively dropped the better you become. Those tools are crutches that people depend on far too much, especially when we've had the same forge pieces since 2010. "Free handing" your maps allows you to use items on different degrees and places you simply cannot do on rotation snap and coordinates. You're more likely to create something people have never seen. Going back to Halo 3, this is clear. Forge maps were the most iconic for this reason alone. Anyone in the forge community who has been invested from the beginning, can clearly remember specific maps from H3 forge and how to play them. This is because creativity was at its peak. you were forced to work and think about your map and pieces. People used pieces in different ways rather than using doors as doors, or walls as walls. You could play a map and see structures and ask "how did you make that?" which does not happen today. Saying people outside the forge community do not care about forge maps is one of the worst opinions I have ever heard. I have played forge maps that play better than well over half of developer maps. Forge creations were appreciated so much in H3 and Reach. By everyone. That is why tons of community created maps were placed into matchmaking. Because they worked. They were different.

 

MultiLockOn's video is not telling you how to make maps, in fact it is the polar opposite. He is saying design maps how you think maps should be. Each Halo game gets progressively worse from a forge community standpoint. Forgers have become arrogant. Personally I have been forging since day one, and recently have gotten criticism from forgers who got into the scene in Halo 4. I've been told to completely re-design large sections of my maps, without explaining how to make them work better first. Simply telling me to do better... Having been so invested in the game and map making process that is the most offensive thing you can tell me. Newer forgers think they're all Jr. developers essentially. That attitude needs to be dropped immediately. In Halo 3 I built a map that generated a quarter million downloads. That is insane, but if I were to remake that map nowadays it would be considered a joke.

 

I'm hoping Halo 5 is the turning point in this terrible mind set. Hopefully we receive all new pieces forcing people to be creative once again. Chances are that if you started forging in Halo reach onward, you have not changed your forging style much at all since 2010. We need to take in account all the points Multi made in this video. Only then will forge be great again, the community will grow, and forge maps will become more relevant than ever before.

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post

Nice video, I really enjoyed it! Cool intro btw! .. Some points debatable no doubt, I'm just glad you dove right into it even if some of it wasn't supposed to be taken literally. I do think you went kind of far off in a way, but in doing so you made some interesting points that can help someone understand what you'll be talking about in the next 7 episodes. Also, I think you talked too fast at times and I had trouble taking in everything you said and having enough time to grasp it... it is a How To series after all so the viewers need to be able to learn as much as possible in the first go (so they come back for more). So maybe slow it down a bit (only a bit!), but keep the passion there because it's really enticing.

 

I had another thing to mention but it escaped me so if it comes back I'll let you know.   :walshy:

 

Any idea when episode 2 is releasing?

  • Upvote (+1) 2

Share this post


Link to post

Nice video, I really enjoyed it! Cool intro btw! .. Some points debatable no doubt, I'm just glad you dove right into it even if some of it wasn't supposed to be taken literally. I do think you went kind of far off in a way, but in doing so you made some interesting points that can help someone understand what you'll be talking about in the next 7 episodes. Also, I think you talked too fast at times and I had trouble taking in everything you said and having enough time to grasp it... it is a How To series after all so the viewers need to be able to learn as much as possible in the first go (so they come back for more). So maybe slow it down a bit (only a bit!), but keep the passion there because it's really enticing.

 

I had another thing to mention but it escaped me so if it comes back I'll let you know. :walshy:

 

Any idea when episode 2 is releasing?

Thanks man! Much appreciated. I have the script done for every episode, I just need to find time to record and edit. Maybe some time within a week?

Share this post


Link to post

Thanks man! Much appreciated. I have the script done for every episode, I just need to find time to record and edit. Maybe some time within a week?

 

Great I should see it in my sub feed!  B)

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post

I really enjoyed everything about this video. Looking forward to eps 2-8. You have one more sub.  :ghost:

Also, I think I'm going to try and forge a halfway decent map now. Let's see where this takes me. :)

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post

I am starting to forge myself. I hope you do a video on spawning. I subbed, and enjoyed your video.

Probably won't do a video on spawning, I don't think there's enough content there to justify an entire video. But if you need help with spawns feel free to add me.

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.