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Toa Axis

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Everything posted by Toa Axis

  1. Because that would require 343 having sensible playlist management, and we can't have that, obviously.
  2. Not sure if people have seen this whole incident. Pretty awful stuff. http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/02/us/mississippi-black-church-vandalized-vote-trump/index.html There's a GoFundMe page up if anyone wants to pitch in to help: https://www.gofundme.com/hopewellbaptist
  3. I really want to know who thought it was a genius design decision to just have shots miss for no reason. And then the netcode is so bad that the game literally deletes bullets from existence, and never was it fixed. Like what the hell Halo 3 pisses me off more than 343's games sometimes.
  4. As cool as it would be, I'd imagine it would be the legal equivalent of Hell to work out when you consider their contract with Activision. And even If you were to get past that, I doubt they would have the manpower to do it since they have their hands full with Destiny.
  5. It was there, but it wasn't that apparent. The remastered graphics really messed with the actual gameplay at some points. For example, when you first board the Truth and Reconciliation, it's actually easier to spot the camo elites with classic graphics due to the fact that their swords glow much brighter. With the remastered graphics you can hardly see them. I really wish CE got a better visual makeover. Oh well :/
  6. Quite. What I found interesting, however, was that it actually ran better using the remastered visuals. Which I suppose is due to the fact that CE played it fast and loose with several elements of its visuals, namely specular and particles. Using the AR continuously would tank the frame rate in many instances using the classic graphics, for example.
  7. MCC was buggy mainly because it was rushed and overly-ambitious, not necessarily due to the outsourcing itself. CEA didn't have anywhere near the number of problems, if I recall.
  8. They did a pretty good job with H2A, so I don't see why their efforts wouldn't be just as good, if not better.
  9. Man, I'm so jealous of Gears fans. They were in the same situation as us, with the series they like being in the hands of a fresh developer. But unlike 343, The Coalition released a solid, faithful game right from the start, and with much better eSports/league support than NuHalo. I recall an interview from them in which they said that they'd rather play it safe and make sure they can get the core of Gears' gameplay down before they start changing things up too much. That's a much better mindset to have than changing everything to make it "their" Gears. It just shows that these kinds of things can be done well, which is a shame to think about when you look at what we got :/
  10. What makes that argument truly fall apart is when you consider that the last "classic" Halo game came out almost a decade ago, with it also being the most successful entry in the series. If traditional Halo had continued onward and people were getting sick of it, or sales were declining, sure, try something new. But traditional Halo hasn't been given a legitimate chance since 2007.
  11. As someone who's been playing it, I have to confirm those thoughts. They pretty much ripped the specialist system from Blops 3 with Rigs, but they have no real personality. They ripped the movement system as well, but the maps don't feel like they're built for them. It's like they made them without the advanced movement in mind, and then later tacked on some wall running routes and called it a day. Speaking of the maps... GAAAHHH They're so bad. They have the same issues that were present in Ghosts, wherein it seems like every space has two or more entrances leading into it, which mitigates camping, but in turn everything becomes a complete clusterfuck with no semblance of flow. Anyone can be anywhere, and you'll often get shot from behind or from the sides because there's no reliable way to predict map movement in most cases. And since the TTK is so low, everyone is boost jumping around corners to get the drop on you and it's supremely annoying. Oh, and sniping is absolutely out of control. Ridiculous. Weapon balance is alright mostly, but ARs are too dominant, and Sniping needs to be addressed. Streaks are whatever. Didn't have many problems with spawns, surprisingly (though the typical BS does still occur from time to time). Overall, my experience has been pretty unpleasant. Probably forgot some stuff, bot those are the big things worthy of mention. Hopefully the make some tweaks for weekend 2 :/ Frontier is one of the worst multiplayer maps I've ever seen in any game.
  12. That's what I think. Or at least, that's where I'm at. I had already been loosing interest in the extended universe stuff, but Halo 5 basically killed much of the passion I had in the Halo Universe going forward.The sole exception to that being Halo Wars 2, and that's mostly due to the fact that they're bringing back old stuff. I've scarcely seen a team fumble the direction of a narrative so hard in my life. Not only that, but they completely and utterly destroyed the themes they were trying to establish in the last game! UGH
  13. There is IIRC but it's buried somewhere.
  14. Just watched it. Disagreed with some stuff, but it was well done, and he delivered his points well. Perhaps more than anything, I find that I disagree with his interpretation of what a Halo "purist" is. When I think of a Halo Purist, I think of someone who has mainly played the games and has not indulged in much-- if any-- of the outside lore. Purism is, in essence, traditionalism. With this interpretation, it would make sense that a Halo Purist would not like extended universe material having such a heavy impact on the primary Halo products, i.e the games. "Halos 1-3 were able to tell their stories just fine without any extraneous material getting in the way, why should I have to deal with it in more recent titles?" This is the question that Halo Purists ask with my self-imposed defenition. This train of thought mainly started to take off after Halo 4's release, which most notably left the motivations of the main villain quite poorly explained. While it was less of an issue in Halo 5, you had several side characters, barring Buck, who had never appeared in any of the games, and were rather poorly developed and one-note in nature. This also extended to the sudden mention of a Sangheli civil war, the introduction of the Domain (though the issues associated with that are more closely linked with the fact that bringing back Cortana was dumb as hell from both a narrative and thematic standpoint), etc.. People are just getting more and more frustrated with that sort of thing, and it's a sentiment shared by what I presume is the majority of Halo fans. So yeah. Purists don't like intrusive background lore in the games from my estimation. As for the Lego thing, I actually agree with him to a certain extent. 343 has made it clear that they want every piece of Halo media to have some sort of relevance to what's happening in the game's universe, thus lessening the odds of non-canon spin-offs. If a Lego Halo game were to ever come to fruition*, the style of comedy that pervades those games would be at drastic odds with the tone of the universe. Not to say that Halo doesn't have some kooky stuff, but those are mostly related to easter eggs and jokes made by characters like Sergeant Johnson. A whole canon Halo story in that sort of tone would feel very out of place. I do disagree with him in regards to a retelling of Halos 1-3, though, since it would contradict what was established in the actual games if we're keeping in line with how 343 wants to handle things. As for his worry with the style of storytelling in Halo games getting more kid-friendly, I disagree with him on that as well. While they'll likely further tone down reliance/inclusion of/on EU material, I see no reason why they would have to sacrifice depth. Ignoring the fact that Halo games have traditionally depicted very simple characters with minimal development (barring ones like Arby or H4 Chief/Cortana), and rather straightforward narratives as well, the implication that a more "kiddy" style of storytelling inherently has less depth than that of an "adult" story is disingenuous at best and harmful at worst. You need only to look at works like Inside Out to see that. So yeah. Solid video, disagreed with some stuff. *Lego doesn't adopt more adult-oriented properties anyways, so if it were to happen, it would be a first. I do hope it happens though, anything to get Halo outta the hands of MegaBlocks >_<
  15. ... Jesus. You're telling me no one caught at least some of this stuff during playtesting?
  16. Yup. A perfect example of how the fulfilment of one design philosophy can't always mesh with certain play environments (the empowerment and experience of "being a Spartan" vs. a competitive multiplayer game in the vein of Halo).
  17. I just finished playing Resistance 3 and Deus Ex Mankind Divided. Had a good time with both. You can definitely tell that Insomniac are fans of Half Life 2. They certainly pulled a lot of inspiration from it, but if you're gonna rip someone off, do it from the best lol. R3 was kind of on the short side, but it was well paced, had good encounter design, fun weapons as you'd expect from an Insomniac game, good variety of locales, and was very good overall. One of the more overlooked PS3 games. Deus Ex was... a bit of a mixed bag. The storytelling in regards to the central narrative was kind of bad, even worse than Human Revolution, which was wasn't that great either if memory serves. Adam has no personal stake in anything going on around him, which made him kind of boring. Like, the player could give him an opinion on certain topics, but Adam can never really engage in any action that actualizes those thoughts-- which is a shame considering the whole Augs vs. Naturals conceit (which isn't handled in the most adept of fashions). The art design is something else I felt iffy on. While it's technically good, no doubt, it feels decidedly less futuristic than Human Revolution, despite taking place two years afterwards. This could be a consequence of taking place primarily in Europe, though. If you've ever been there, they tend to take newer technologies and integrate them into older structures, since they are built quite solidly using lots of stonework, thus preventing the need to tear them down in many cases (this also results in the color palette being very muted much of the time). I suppose this isn't really a criticism of the art design itself, just a personal grievance of mine. What I must compliment though, is the sheer amount of asset variety. The amount of unique assets throughout the game is honestly staggering. If you were to walk down the streets of Prague and throw a dart every fifteen or so feet, it's not uncommon to see a unique building or set of objects/props with their own history and style. Very impressive work by the team at Eidos Montreal. The core systems, however, are where the game truly shines. Even though there's only one hub as opposed to the two in the game's predecessor, it's decidedly more dense and filled with things to see and do. There are so many places to duck into, bits n' bobs to interact with, and side stories/objectives to find. And the best part is that nearly all of them are very in-depth in terms of the process of completing them. They even have varying effects on the main quest line, which is very nice. The level design is superb as well, and the different sandboxes they place you into are quite expansive and filled with different opportunities at every turn. Unfortunately, the game suffers some of the same flaws as Human Revolution. The game has an almost comical reliance on air vents for alternate routes, them being the go-to option for differing paths much of the time. And they also failed in their attempt to make action-y play styles more viable, because stealth/hacking is still by far the best option of approach, which in a game that supposedly allows the player to approach situations however they wish is kinda bad. Animations are very stilted and unnatural as well, which is a shame since the game overall looks so much better. There's more I could go on about, and my post is probably kinda disjointed and ramble-y, but bottom line is that the game is pretty good, though very flawed from a thematic and some big core gameplay aspects. Still a solid time though.
  18. That's also a pretty huge part of it. It's funny because, as I understand it, radar during beta actually semi-balanced those negative aspects that run so rampant in the current game. Which still isn't good, I just thought it was a bit ironic. And yeah, pretty much any other developer would've done something about it by now. But alas.
  19. It's not just your rank. Spartan Charge is really, really easy to abuse. I only ever played the game when it was free for a bit, but even in that short time it was clear as day as to the effect it had on the flow of some encounters. It, ironically, amplifies sprint's problems, even after they went through the effort to nerf it (though that doesn't matter as much when thrust exists, which is arguably even more of a viable strategy for escape/movement than sprint). The stretched out maps, more sparse cover placement, etc, all remain, and by proxy still necessitate the mechanic's use-- but even though escapability is nerfed (the problem still remains, of course), it can be used as a tool for aggression, and can be even more annoying than those stupid double-melee beat downs. It puts the opponent at a severe disadvantage in most cases (thus lessening opportunity for comebacks-- a staple of Halo), it slightly tracks you FFS, and, at least in my experience, you aren't punished that hard for whiffing it, since you can just YOLO thrust+sprint out of there. I remember Josh talking about how it was meant to be more of a crowd pleaser move used in high level play, but it has such an adverse effect on the base game flow that I would rather it be gone entirely-- and there are many more who share that sentiment.
  20. It's because 343 can't seem to create properly difficult encounters to save their lives. I didn't get to play Warzone before the trial was up, but the campaign was evidence enough of how they handle PvE stuff. The most "difficult" sections are there ones where they throw asinine combinations of enemies at you with minimal options of approach. Like, I should not be stuck behind cover taking potshots at Knights who are spamming my position with Incineration Cannons along with two Ghosts and what feels like eighty million Shade turrets while my teammates do jack shit in a goddamn HALO game. I want to be out there IN THE FIGHT. They do this because their AI isn't well tuned to behave in a way that challenges the player through action. Instead they just throw more crap at you.
  21. It would kind of have to, considering the Foundry is busted and drained of resources. The question is if this means that the Brutes will be major players going forward. All I know is that I want to fight that Scarab in Halo 6, terrifying as it may be.
  22. Doom is fun, for me at least, but its gameplay would be much more suited to traditional arena setup. That means no loadouts, no demon rune, and weapons on-map. It also has issues with readability of damage. In Halo, it's very easy to tell how much damage you have done or are currently doing to someone, and in other contemporary shooters, kill times are generally pretty short, which means you don't really have to worry about how much damage you're dishing out. In Doom however, you spawn with full health, but no armor, needing to pick it up on the map. What this means is that there's no reliable way to get a bead on how much health an opponent has. You may nail one guy with one shot of the Super Shotgun but the next guy may take 3-4 rounds to kill.
  23. It's not so much that they had a false 60 as much as they (the Campaign modes mostly) didn't hold a consistent 60. The multiplayer modes on the other hand reach(ed) the target frame rate most of the time.
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