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Xandrith

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  1. okay i'm going to stop talking to you now
  2. The whole "he picked it up therefore it's okay" idea reminds me of the 'if there is a God why is there evil' question. It just keeps coming up, and no matter how many times it's answered, here it comes again. Look, you could 'earn' a self-aiming laser gun by picking it up, but you don't then earn every kill you get with it just because you picked up the gun. The weapon itself earns the kill, because it aims itself. Failing to make distinctions in this area leads to Halo 5, where every weapon is stupidly easy to use, borderline un-counterable, and yet, according to this argument, that's all okay because "he went out of his way to get the gun".
  3. If we admit something needs to be put in check, then an inherent check is in order. Designing a weapon to counter abilities sounds great, that is, until you're on the other side and can't do a thing about it. It would be like placing a weapon in a shitty area of a map to theoretically 'counter' a broken position, just to see players carry the weapon up to said position, and tip the scales even more in favor of the broken spot. But, a better utility weapon is an inherent check, so bravo
  4. I just want to say, In order to protect what most assuredly is special about CE as an experience, it's easy to go too far. Call it the law of hyper-correction. So, yeah, spawning in the middle of prisoner is stupid. Randoms are fundamentally stupid. The idea of direct upgrades on map, especially to the over rewarding degree of rockets and camo, is stupid. The maps are generally bad (with exception) and only work because of the pistol. Systems within the game like bullet sway and the spawning logic are almost impossible to decipher without a wiki, and that's stupid. I could go on, but I think you get the point.
  5. I just want to take this opportunity to point out something I've been thinking about lately, and while it's not on the topic of FOV, it is relevant to what I've highlighted green in the post above. In that segment, you've essentially mirrored the sentiment that I believe most people hold regarding 'immersion', and to be frank, I don't think it means what we think it means. If the goal of 'immersion' is to dissolve all barriers between the player and the experience so that they become inseparable, then I think we can all agree on that definition, and I think we all want that experience. The question then becomes, how do we get there? Well first, You must consider the players limited inputs. Unless we're talking VR, we're essentially clicking buttons when we play a game, and we only have so many of them. Something like a thumbstick transcends this paradigm, allowing for partial inputs and infinitely granular directional control (which is why thumbsticks are far superior to WASD for movement, but that's a topic for another discussion). The point is, we're limited. The next point to consider is just how incredibly sensitive the human mind is to our own faculty. Whenever we have a muscle twitch, we instantly notice it, and instantly focus on it, because it's a part of me that has seemingly violated the sovereignty over my own body that we all assume we have and almost always do have. That's why multiple sclerosis is such a horrifying disease to think about. The thought of losing control over my own 'inputs' is a scary one to say the least. So then, put the two together. If we're limited by our controls, and our every fiber is tuned to recognize foreign inputs, then a game designer must be extremely careful not to surpass our limitations if he wishes to maintain immersion as previously defined. For example, we could look at your own ideas to make Halo more 'personal' with more in-depth melee animations. In my opinion, this could just as easily have the opposite effect and disconnect the player from the experience. Think about Battlefield, or the new MW game. Both games selling points are immersion, but they've conflated immersion with realism, and sport a million and one little animations, a ton of screen shake/bounce, and even blurred vision at times. The problem with these adornments, while realistic, go beyond my inputs and happen on their own. Like the muscle spasm earlier spoken about, they stick out, and every single happening that I didn't have anything to do with, everything that happens on my screen that surpasses my limited inputs is just another spasm, another reminder that I'm indeed playing a game, and that much of what is actually happening on screen has little to do with my will for it or against it. These reminders become especially offensive when the in-game system that goes beyond the player also happens to get in the way. Flinch and screen shake making me miss my shots comes to mind, and yes, I'm salty about it. To come full circle back to a post I made in the MCC thread, I think this is all why Halo 2 feels so good. The game does what I want it to do, and nothing more. I also think this is why Battlefield always felt clunky after playing COD games and even Halo. And yes, that's why Modern Warfare felt like shit.
  6. I can't believe what I'm feeling when I play Halo 2, no other console game even comes close
  7. No, my bad, not the best word choice. I'm still convinced that you knew what I meant, but I'll clarify. There's no functional difference worth talking about, because the problems with radar and footsteps are the same, and even accentuated with the latter (depending on the game, but for most it's true.) At least I can crouch and move, albeit slowly, with radar. In games like PUBG, the new MW, and Apex to a lesser extent, I feel like there's a hidden progress bar that grows every time I move, like bad karma building up that'll eventually lead to my demise if I don't pick a corner and let it deplete.
  8. Qualitative as in its function, as in meanings, concepts, and so on. You can take my statement that literally if you like, but I think you know what I was saying.
  9. There is no qualitative difference between footsteps and radar.
  10. Sounds like "you got robbed" with extra steps
  11. Put together some of my random clips so I can finally delete everything
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