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Zeruel's ULTIMATE Gaming PC Build Guide Thread [2015]


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#1   ZerueLX11

ZerueLX11

    PC Master Race

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Posted 07 February 2015 - 10:09 PM

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Zeruel's ULTIMATE Gaming PC Build Guide Thread [2015]
 
For the Beyond community!
 
PC gaming... It has been on the rise over the past few years now and many people have started to invest in this higher form of gaming. With console gaming becoming more casual, console exclusives being more available on PC, Cross platform play(multiplayer too) on Windows 10 and Xbox exclusives, reasons to switch over to PC have become numerous.
 
 
 
However, the initial jump into PC may be difficult for some people, the build process, the myriads of different parts to pick from, and integration into a new community. 
 
This thread will go over how to invest into a PC DESKTOP, build one at different price points, and know the significance of the naming schemes of different PC components. 
 
For Tech Support, Gaming Monitors, Gaming Headsets, and Microphones please visit these other forum postings!
 
Gaming Headsets: COMING SOON!
Microphones: COMING SOON!
 
 
Why build a PC?  
 
 
 
 
The PC is an excellent gaming platform for todays gaming needs. It can not only perform TRUE 1080p gaming at 60 frames but perform at much higher quality as well. Its not only for gaming either, PCs can be used to stream, create content, and  much more! The initial investment may be pricey but in the long run it can be cheaper and offer a better experience.
 
The time for PC is now, and more and more is being invested into PC, new graphics, virtual reality headsets, G -Sync, Adaptive Sync... PCs are leading the charge into innovation and gaming!
 
 
 
PC Components
 
This section will go over each component of PC that is required for an entire PC. 
 
  • CPU
  • Motherboard
  • RAM
  • CPU Cooler
  • GPU
  • PSU
  • SSD and HDD
  • Case
  • Fans
  • ODD( optional )
  • OS
 
CPU
 
central-processing-unit-cpu.jpg
 
 
The Central Processing Unit ( CPU ) is what does all the calculations, numbers, running programs, and all that fun stuff. To increase the efficiency of some processors they have multiple "cores" which spreads the work load across the CPU. Some CPUs include integrated graphics but I won't include this since integrated graphics are not powerful enough just yet. 
 
CPUs can be overclocked to run faster at the expense of higher heat and power levels. 
 
Processor power/speed is based on SINGLE CORE performance and clock speed based on Gigahertz(GHz). Single core performance relates to IPC or Instructions per cycle. To put this in an analogy, think of moving large bags at a slower speed versus moving small bags at a faster speed! 
 
 
The two companies that make processors for PCs are Intel and AMD. Generally Intel processors are STRONGER than AMD processors in SINGLE core performance, however, AMD processors are far cheaper than Intel and still give reasonable performance in gaming. 
 
Intel-e-AMD.png
 
CPUs have classifications depending on what MotherBoard they are meant for. We will go over 4 different processors that are relevant to the gaming market.
 
 
 
Intel Processors
 
 
There are two classes of Intel processors, "consumer" and "prosumer" processors. These processors are supported by a SPECIFIC chipset that allows the processor to work on a certain motherboard.
 
Intel processors feature Hyper Threading which can fool the Operating System into thinking that ONE core is actually TWO cores, so you have Physical Cores and Virtual cores. I will represent this a physical cores plus virtual cores ( p + v ). 
 
Informational Video on Hyper Threading
Spoiler
 
 
The "Consumer" Processors
 
 
Consumer processors are ranked in processing power in this fashion and use the rank in its naming scheme....
 
 
Pentium -> i3 -> i5 -> i7

 

  • Pentium processors are dual cored and can be some times over clocked.
  • i3 processors are dual cored, and cannot be overclocked. Some i3  processors have Hyper Threading ( 2p + 2v ).
  • i5 processors are quad cored, the highest tier i5 can be overclocked.
  • i7 processors are quad cored, features Hyper Threading( 4p + 4v ) and can be over clocked at the highest tier.
The next part of an intel processor is the generation number plus the tier number. Both these numbers combined make a four digit number, "xxxx". Each generation has specific code name that goes along with it. If the processor is overclockable there will be a "k" at the end of the number. Sometimes there will be a "T" or "S" at the end but those are unimportant to a gamer. The Pentium G3258 is a 20th Anniversary edition that is only pentium to overclock.
 
EXAMPLES
 
  1. Pentium Gxxxx
  2. i3 xxxx
  3. i5 xxxx(k)
  4. i7 xxxx(k)
 
Example of generation code names if order of newest(top) to oldest(bottom).
 
  1. Haswell - Refresh
  2. Haswell
  3. Ivy Bridge 
  4. Sandy Bridge

Intel is weird with their name but to put it shortly the first number in the 4 digit number indicates the generation, the next three numbers determine how high the clock speed is in some way.

 

EXAMPLE

 

Haswell - Refresh           

 

  1. i7 4790k @ 4.0 GHz   $340 
  2. i7 4790   @ 3.6 GHz   $300
  3. i5 4690k @ 3.5 GHz   $245
  4. i5 4690   @ 3.5 GHz   $225
  5. i5 4460   @ 3.2 GHz   $190
  6. i3 4370   @ 3.8 GHz   $160
  7. i3 4150   @ 3.5 GHz   $120
  8. Pentium G3258  @ 3.2Ghz  $70

 

Here is a link for reference...

 

In terms of gaming the Pentium( 20th Anv ), i3 and i5 processors are good enough. The i7 processors are great also but more pricey since they are meant more for content creation. i7 processors have cores which can be utilized by video/picture/3D rendering programs and stuff like that.

 

http://www.intel.com...or-numbers.html

 

 

 

The "Prosumer" Processors

 

The Prosumer processors are all ranked as i7 processors and have hyper threading. The biggest difference is that they have more cores which can be utilized for EXTREME content creation. All these processors are OVERCLOCKABLE!

 

The naming scheme is similar to the "consumer" processors with a few exceptions.

 

Example of generation code names if order of newest(top) to oldest(bottom).
 
  1. Haswell - E
  2. Ivy Bridge - E

Currently there are only 3 "prosumer" processors for Haswell - E

 

Haswell - E

 

  1. i7 5820k @ 3.3Ghz -> 6 core hyper threaded processor ( 6p + 6v )    $390
  2. i7 5930k @ 3.5Ghz -> 6 core hyper threaded processor ( 6p + 6v )    $580
  3. i7 5960X @ 3.0Ghz -> 8 core hyper threaded processor ( 8p + 8v )   $1050 MONSTER!!  

 

 

Here is a link for further reference: http://www.intel.com...or-numbers.html

 

 

AMD Processors

 

In a sense all AMD processors are "consumer" processors with nothing that really competes with intels i7 processors that can be good for video editing. AMD processors run at higher clock speeds but have a lower IPC compared to intel. The true strength of AMD is that offer decent processors for a way lower price than Intel. The highest priced AMD 4 core processor is half the price of the lowest priced Intel processor. 

 

 

AMD has two series of processors that I will be going over. The Athlon X4 series and the FX series.

 

 

Athlon X4 Series

 

 

 

The Athlon X4 series offers a low cost 4 core processor solution. Similar to Intel they have generation code names, and the first digit in the three digit    AMD processors in general can be overclocked with out restrictions. 

 

 

There are only 2 "current Athlon CPUs that I will recommend for budget gaming.

 

 

LIST

  1. Kaveri         Athlon X4 860k @ 3.7GHz  $80
  2. Richland     Athlon X4 760k @ 3.8GHz  $78

 

The Kaveri CPU architecture is the latest an offers an higher IPC than the other Athlon cpus and even the FX processor series.

 

 

FX Series

 

 

 

The FX series is a really old processor by todays standard so I personally have a hard time recommending it, however, I will still go over the FX series. 

 

Pretty much all FX processors can be overclocked, also they use a 4 digit naming scheme. The first digit of the 4 digit number actually represents how many CORES the processor has, very different from Intel( 9xxx processors still have 8 cores not 9!. ). The last 3 digits determine the speed of the processor. 

 

LIST

 

  1. FX 9590 @ 4.7GHz   $240
  2. FX 8370 @ 4.0GHz   $200
  3. FX 8350 @ 4.0GHz   $180
  4. FX 8320 @ 3.5GHz   $150
  5. FX 6350 @ 3.9GHz   $125
  6. FX 6300 @ 3.5GHz   $110
  7. FX 4300 @ 3.8GHz   $100

 

Keep in mind, the IPC or single core performance is NOT as good as Intel's or the latest Athlon X4 860k. This processor is leaning on the edge of its lifetime. The 8 core processors are good for a cheap content creation PC even playing games for cheap but for little more you can get something more up to date and stronger.

 

 

 

Motherboard

 

motherboards.jpg

 

 

The motherboard is where all other components of the PC will connect to. Each motherboard has a "chipset" and "socket" that will determine what processor will work with the motherboard. 

 

Informational on What is a motherboard!

Spoiler

 

Sometimes when a CPU changes to a new generation you may have to update the BIOS(  Basic Input Out System  ) on your motherboard, or not. In some cases you need a new motherboard all together.

 

The BIOS is like a basic operating system that controls the voltages to your computer and the speed of the many processors and co-processors in your PC. You edit the settings here if you want to overclock.

 

A typical motherboard can only use AMD or Intel processors depending on what chipset/socket they are using, however, DIFFERENT motherboard manufacturers have licences to make motherboards for AMD or Intel processors. Manufactures will make motherboards with extra features and at different quality levels so its up to you to decide from which manufacture you will buy from after you decide what CPU and chipset you want. Prices will vary from $50 to about $600 for motherboards.

 

Informational video on chipsets

Spoiler

 

LIST of Top motherboard Manufacturers

 

  • ASUS
  • MSI
  • Gigabyte
  • AsRock
  • EVGA
  • BioStar
  • ECS

 

Motherboard Sizes

 

Motherboards come in many different sizes. The common sizes are..

 

  • mini - ITX
  • micro - ATX
  • ATX 
  • E -ATX
  • XL - ATX

Informational video on motherboard sizes

Spoiler

 

Intel Motherboards

 

 

Again Intel motherboards are different depending if you are using a "consumer" or "prosumer" CPU.

 

The "consumer" Motherboards

 

The socket that Intel "consumer" motherboards used actually is just the number of "pins" on the CPU, the latest generation uses 1150 pins. The number of pins changes and sometimes and some CPUs may be backwards compatibles with different sockets or chipsets but you would need to do further research on that since it changes every new CPU launch. The chipset works in the same fashion, it may or may not support newer or older CPUs aside from the generation of CPUs it was released with.

 

The way the naming scheme works is that its based off the chipset. It is a single letter followed by two digits. The letter will determine if the board is mean for Overclocking, casual, or business use( all of which are good for gaming! ). The first digit represents the series number and the second is not all too important.  

 

Example 

  1. Zxx  - Overclocking
  2. Hxx  - Casual( some overclocking )
  3. Bxx  - Business 

All the Z,H, and B motherboards perform the same in gaming aside from the little extra you get from overclocking.

 

 

Examples of chipset and CPU generation change!

 

Haswell - Refresh [ Intel 9 series ] 

  • Z97
  • H97  

Haswell  [ Intel 8 series ] 

  • Z87
  • H87
  • B85

The "Prosumer" Motherboards

 

The prosumer motherboards work in the same fashion expect that they use 2011 "pins" and the motherboards cost more because they are packed with useful features for professional work. The first letter is always an "X" because these motherboards are all the same tier in that sense. The first digit represent the generation number and the second is not too important again.

 

Examples of chipset and CPU generation change!

 

Haswell - E [ Intel 9 series ]

  • X99 

Ivy Bridge - E [ Intel 7 series ]

  • X79

 

AMD Motherboards

 

AMD has different motherboards for their Athlon and FX series CPUs somewhat like Intel. Since AMD does not change their CPU sockets as often as intel they are classified as FM2+ motherboards or AM3+ motherboards. Generally AMD motherboards are cheaper than Intel but quality and features can suffer in some cases. Still, AMD motherboards are great for budget gaming solutions and still pack a punch. 

 

 

FM2+ Motherboards

 

FM2+ motherboards are meant for the Athlon X4 processors. The naming scheme for the chipset of these motherboards is not all different from Intel, it is a single letter follow by a two digit number then by another letter. 

 

IMPORTANT FACTS!!!

  • AMD is lenient about overclocking, BUT some motherboards can burn out from overclocking too high since AMD does not regulate this, unlike Intel. The higher the two digit number the better quality overall for overclocking and more features.
  • Any number above 60+ can use a 6GBs hard drive speed, below 60 hard drives will be limited to 3GBs even if they are rated for 6GBs. 

 

LIST of FM2+ chipsets

  • A88X
  • A78
  • A75
  • A70M
  • A68H
  • A58
  • A55

 

AM3+ Motherboards

 

AM3+ motherboards are meant for the FX series of processors, essentially the higher number you go the better quality you get when overclocking and more features, somewhat the same as the FM2+ motherboards. Keep in mind the 760G and 880G chipsets do not support 6Gbs Hard drives.

 

LIST of AM3+ chipsets

  • 990FX
  • 990X
  • 970
  • 880G
  • 760G

 

 

 

RAM

 

18kx8ycs8ou55jpg.jpg

 

Ram is used to store temporary data that needs to be accessed FAST in the computer. For example when you are loading a map in a game it goes from the hard drive to the RAM. Another example is loading a youtube video, the youtube video is stored in the RAM.

 

Currently we are in a transition period for RAM, there are two types of RAM DDR3 and DDR4. Currently ONLY the Intel X99 motherboards can use DDR4. There really is little difference in performance between DDR3 and DDR4 aside from larger capacities. 

 

Informational Video on DDR4

Spoiler

 

RAM Sizes

 

Random Access Memory ( RAM ) comes in "stick(s)" and at different capacities. For example a package of a 1x8GB stick of RAM is just a single stick of 8GB of RAM, a 2x8GB package consists of two 1x8GB sticks of RAM.

 

Common RAM Sizes

 

  • 1x4GB = 4GB
  • 2x4GB = 8GB 
  • 1x8GB = 8GB
  • 2x8GB = 16GB
  • 4x8GB = 32GB

 

RAM Speeds

 

Ram comes at different latency ratings( CAS ) and clock speeds(MHz). Generally higher speeds don't offer that much performance, however, the rule is that if the clock speed goes up so does the latency, but performance still doesn't chnage all that much. 1600MHz CAS 9 is the common base RAM speed that will give excellent performance in gaming and other things.  

 

Examples

  • 1600MHz CAS 9
  • 1866MHz CAS 10
  • 2133MHz CAS 10
  • 2400MHz CAS 11

 

How much RAM do I need?

  • 4GB - Web Browsing
  • 8GB - Gaming
  • 16GB+ Gaming/Content Creation

Informational Video on RAM usage

Spoiler

 

 

RAM Channels

 

RAM can either be dual channel or quad channel. RAM is installed based on how many channels there are on a motherboard.

 

Informational Video on Memory Channels

Spoiler

 

 

XMP RAM Memory Profiles

 

Some times you may need to go into your motherboard BIOS/UEFI to select the right XMP Memory Profile to ensure it runs at the right speeds and latency!

 

Informational Video on XMP Memory Profiles

Spoiler

 

CPU COOLERS

 

 

corsair-cpu-cooler-1.jpg2306.jpg

 

The CPU of a computer gets really hot so it must be cooled properly to prevent thermal throttling( overheating failsafe ).

There are three basic ways a CPU can be cooled. Air Cooling, Water Cooling, Custom Water Cooling. Be for CPU coolers are installed Thermal Compound is applied on the CPU  so the CPU can transfer heat quicker and more efficient tot he CPU cooler.  

 

 

Air Cooling

 

The Cooling method uses vapor chambers or heatpipes that are made of copper and filled with special liquid to disperse heat through an array of aluminium fins which are called heat sinks. Air cooler have many different sizes and come in many different shapes, BEWARE some coolers interfere with the RAM placements

 

Informational Video on Vapor Chambers

Spoiler

 

Informational Video on Heatsinks

Spoiler

 

 

 

Water Cooling

 

Another method of cooling is a closed water cooling loop. A closed loop is a all in one water cooling solution. Typically the part that attaches to the CPU has the liquid pump and the water block. A water block is the copper part that is cooled by water and touches the CPU to transfer heat. 

 

The water block/pump is attached via tubes to a radiator. The radiators used on closed loops come in many different sizes. They come in either single, double, or triple sizes, which relates to the length putting 120mm/140mm fans next to each other.  

 

120mm or 140mm Fans are typical sized fans that cool the radiator. They are placed along the length on the radiator.

 

Informational Video on Water Cooling Radiators

Spoiler

 

 

Custom Water Cooling

 

Custom water cooling is buying every component ( tubes, radiator, pump, water pump ), and putting it together yourself. This is a very advanced form of cooling and can be high maintenance. 

 

31366_3_maingear_unleashes_liquid_chille

 

 

 

 

 

GPU

  

AMD-Radeon-R9-290X-and-NVIDIA-GeForce-78

 

The Graphics Processing Unit( GPU ) is the where all those pretty 1080p+ 60+ frames get processed to give you that beautifully smooth visual fidelity. The GPU or graphics card acts as co-processor and works with the CPU to run games.

 

Graphics cards have VRAM(Video RAM) which stores are the frames of gameplay its processing. VRAM ranges from 1GB to 4GB on todays graphics cards. The GPU needs to be powerful enough to utilize the VRAM efficiently, BEWARE more VRAM isn't always going to be best. 

 

Graphics cards will have video ports in the back of them to output video to the monitor or TV they are plugged in to.

 

List of Common Video Ports

 

  • Display Port
  • HDMI
  • DVI
  • VGA - OLD DO NOT USE!!

 

The two companies that makes GPUs are AMD and Nvidia. Just like with motherboards AMD and Nvidia just make the little processors chips that go on the graphics card, other manufacturers make the cooling system and PCB that the GPU goes in. Nvidia and AMD do make the graphics card themselves, those Graphics cards are called "Reference" cards while cards made from other manufacturers are called "Non- reference" cards. 

 

Different cards may take up a different amount of "slots" in your computer case, generally cards take two but they could take one or three.Make sure you have the space!

 

 

LIST of Top Graphics Card Manufacturers

 

  • ASUS
  • MSI
  • Gigabyte
  • EVGA
  • Sapphire
  • Galaxy
  •  Zotac
  • HIS
  • XFX
  • Inno3D
  • Powercolor

Depending on what tier graphics card you get the price will vary from 100$ to 1000$ in some cases. AMD cards are generally cheaper than Nvidia cards, their price to performance is nearly unbeatable. But! Nvidia still offers the most powerful cards and usually come out on top in terms of putting out raw frames per a second, not to mention providing extra features.

 

 

Nvidia GeForce

 

At the highest tier of raw power Nvidia has maintained itself as the king, not to mention it has pretty good features for content creators. 

 

To use an Nvidia graphics card you have to insert into a PCIe 3.0 slot on your motherboard, once you start up your computer things will look like shit sub-720p!, BECAUSE you have to install the Nvidia Graphics Drivers before you can view anything beautiful! 

 

Nvidia's GeForce Experience 2.0 is the program that handles all the driver updating, but not only does it do that! You can use it record PC games with out a performance hit! No capture cards necessary! Streaming software like OBS can access the GPU encoder so you can stream to Twitch with out a performance hit too!.

 

You can use 2 to 4 Nvidia GPUs in a motherboard as long as your motherboard can support them. This is called Nvidia SLI. Usually it is recommend to use one strong GPU than two weaker ones since there could be issues using two GPUs in SLI but SLI has become more stable over the years and games have been programmed to support it better. 3 or 4 way SLI is never a good choice because games are rarely programmed well enough to utilize them efficiently. Also using two GPUs in 2 way SLI does not mean you get doubled performance, depending on how well a game in programmed you may get x1.4 - x1.8 performance gains in frames per a second but NEVER x2.0. Also SLI does not add up your VRAM, each GPU in the SLI configuration can only use as much as it came with. 

 

For SLI to work you need a small ribbon cable that will connect the graphics cards together. These are called SLI bridges. 

 

Example 

  • 1 GPU = 60fps
  • 2 Way SLI = 100fps
  • 3 Way SLI = 130fps
  • 4 Way SLI = 140fps

This will be common for many games, there will be point where it isn't worth it to buy more than 2 GPUs. Two - Way SLI is the way to go if you want more than one GPU, it offers the best performance and stability for the price!

 

Informational Video on SLI

Spoiler

 

Nvidia gaming GPUs are labeled as 'GTX'  while the lesser ones are labeled at GT. I will just focus on the GTX GPUs, the GT GPUs are not suitable for gaming.

 

​The naming scheme consists of a 3 digit number which may or may not be followed by the letters "Ti". The first digit represents the generation number, the next two digits are counted in tens ( 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 ), these represent the performance level . The 'x90' class of GPUs have two GPUs on a single card, which is like 2 way SLI but you are not using two individual graphics card but a single one! A "Ti" Graphics card is just a stronger version of an already release graphics card.

 

 EXAMPLES

 

Current Generation 900 Series

  1. GTX 980 ~$550
  2. GTX 970 ~$300
  3. GTX 960 ~$200
  4. More to be release!

Last Generation 700 Series SOLD OUT or HARD TO FIND

  1. GTX 780Ti  ~$650
  2. GTX 780     ~$550
  3. GTX 770     ~$320
  4. GTX 760     ~$250
  5. GTX 750Ti  ~$150
  6. GTX 750     ~$120
  7. GT   740     ~$100

G - Sync

 

This is a new technology developed by Nvidia. G - Sync matches the refresh of the monitor with the GPU to avoid screen tearing. Previously V - Sync was used but V - Sync induces lag and stuttering. Take note G - Sync ONLY WORKS with Display Port, not HDMI or DVI or anything other video port. 

 

G - Sync is a proprietary technology by Nvidia and it will add a ~$200 dollar hardware cost to any monitor that uses this technology, so expect G - Sync monitors to be very expensive.

 

 

 

AMD Radeon

 

AMD GPUs have always been held in high regard for not being as expensive as Nvidia, they have excellent price to performance ratios. They do tend to run a bit hotter and draw, but not at ridiculous amounts. 

 

AMD Graphics cards pretty much work the same as Nvidia Graphics cards but they different names for the equivalent functionality.

 

AMD Gaming Evolve works just like the Nvidia GeForce Experience 2.0, you can record gameplay, stream, and optimize games.  

 

AMD's version of SLI is called CrossFire, it works like SLI with the same pros and cons. Except! CrossFire does not require a ribbon cable anymore for the graphics cards to work together. 

 

Informational Video on Crossfire

Spoiler

 

The naming scheme for AMD Radeon graphics has recently change and is a bit different than Nvidia's naming scheme. They have two classes of graphics cards, the R7 lower end and the R9 higher end. After the classes designation is a 3 digit number that may or may not be followed by an 'X'. The first digit is the generation number, the second digit is the tier level, the third digit is either a 0 or 5. A '5' means its an upgraded version of the card. If there is an 'X' at the end of the 3 digit number that means the card is a slightly overclocked version of the card.   AMD R9 x95X versions of the their graphics cards have two GPU processors inside of them, which functions like Nvidia's GTX x90 class of Graphics processors.

 

 

Future Generation  AMD 300 Series

  1. R9 395X   $? 
  2. R9 390X   $?
  3. R9 390     $?
  4. R9 380X   $?
  5. R9 380     $?
  6. R9 370X   $?
  7. R9 370     $?
  8. R7 360X   $?

Current Generation AMD 200 Series

  1. R9 295X   ~$700 
  2. R9 290X   ~$310
  3. R9 290     ~$270
  4. R9 285     ~$220
  5. R9 280X   ~$250
  6. R9 280     ~$190
  7. R9 270X   ~$170
  8. R9 270     ~$150
  9. R7 265     ~$140
  10. R7 260X   ~$120

 

Adaptive(Free) - Sync

 

This is AMDs version of G - Sync it functions the same as G - Sync, BUT its actually incorporated as a STANDARD for all newer monitors to use. Just like HDMI, DVI or Display Port are standards and have revisions ( Example HDMI 2.0, 1.4a, 1.3 ), Free - Sync uses the Display Port 1.2a STANDARD  to give the same functionality as G - Sync. This means since that is a built in standard that all Monitor manufacturers follow, so it will have a very little affect to the cost of a monitor.

 

Informational Video on Adaptive Sync

Spoiler

 

 

PSU

 

standard-psu-100021930-gallery.jpg

 

 

The Power Supply Unit(PSU) is what powers your entire PC. It is very important not to skimp out on your PSU, because there have been numerous accounts of cheapy PSU exploding and frying some of the PC components with it. Its very important to buy a PSU at a decent price and from a well known manufacturer.  

 

The PSU has multiple wires that pretty much connect to everything in your PC. 

 

Well Known Manufacturers

  • SeaSonic
  • Corsair
  • EVGA
  • Antec
  • CoolerMaster
  • Thermaltake 
  • Rosewill
  • Enermax 

 

Another factor to buying a power supply is that it MUST HAVE 80 Plus efficiency. 80 Plus is a rating that will determine the power efficiency of a PSU. Any PSU that has an 80 Plus rating is guaranteed to be 80% efficient in its power usage, any higher tiers of the 80 Plus standard will give you slightly higher efficiency up to 95%.

 

80 Plus Tiers

 

  1. 80 Plus Titanium
  2. 80 Plus Platinum
  3. 80 Plus Gold
  4. 80 Plus Silver
  5. 80 Plus Bronze
  6. 80 Plus 

Informational Video on 80 Plus

Spoiler

 

 

Wattage

 

PSUs are also rated to give a certain amount of wattage to your PC, THE STRONGER YOUR PC the HIGHER wattage you NEED!

 

Common Wattage Ratings

 

  1. 1500W
  2. 1200W
  3. 1000W
  4. 950W
  5. 850W
  6. 750W
  7. 650W
  8. 600W
  9. 550W
  10. 500W

Thankfully advances in PC power efficiency most PCs won't require a HUGE amount of wattage to power the PC. If you need help calculating how much wattage you need lots of websites will help you, I will link a good website to use for this in the Building the PC section of this post.

 

Modular and non - modular

 

Some Power supplies come with wires that are non removable, other power supplies have wires that can be removed which can help clear out wire clutter.

  • Non - Modular : All wires cannot be removed 
  • Semi - Modular: Some wires cannot be removed but some wires can be removed which helps with wire clutter.
  • Full - Modular: All wires can be removed and you can use only what you need. 

Informational Video on Modular vs Non-Modular PSUs

Spoiler

 

 

SSD and HDD

 

samsung-ssd-840-evo.jpgWD_4TB_Black_top.jpg

 

 

 

SSDs and HDDs are both storage solutions. Working on a montage, saved a l33t 360 sniper no-scope clip, it all stores in yours in your SSD or HDD. Anything you want to save for long periods of time is saved here, however, both storage solutions come with there pros and cons.

 

SSD ( Solid State Drives ) 

 

SSDs are very FAST, faster than any HDD. Also they are very silent since nothing is spinning inside of them. They still are a newer technology and they still are very expensive. Once you experience the speed of a SSD, fast boot times, apps opening in a few seconds, games loading super fast, its hard to go back. Also they are smaller than HDDs!

 

General Pricing 

  1. 1TB:       $500
  2. 512GB:   $250
  3. 256GB    $125
  4. 128GB    $100 

 

HDD ( Hard Disk Drive ) 

 

HDDs are slower than SSDs but they have been around for a long time and you get a HUGE amount of storage for a good price. If you are used to console loading times, and have never used an SSD you will be fine. The big different between SSDs and HDDs is speed, some people are ok waiting  20 or 30 seconds for games to load and other things like that. 

 

General Pricing

  1. 1TB: $50 - $70
  2. 2TB: $125
  3. 3TB: $170
  4. 4TB: $225

 

Case

 

case-gaming-multi.jpg

 

The Case holds all the PC components together through screws and slots. There are too many ways a case can be made BUT the three important things to know before you buy a case, does your motherboard, CPU Cooler, and ( to a lesser extent ) PSU fit in the case? You will have to look up in the case specs if it can fit different sizes of motherboards, CPU coolers or CPUs.

 

Example

  • A case that fits only a Mini -ITX motherboard will not fit an ATX motherboard

 

Informational Video on Case sizes

Spoiler

 

Fan placement is also essential too. Some cases have fan places in the FRONT, SIDE, BACK, TOP, and even BOTTOM places of the case. You want to make sure air flows nicely through your case.

 

Example of good air flow

 

  • Air flows through a fan in the front in the case and exhausts through a fan in a back of the case.

 

 

Fans

 

fans1.png

 

 

Fans are used to cool and provide air flow to the many components in your PC. Fans are also attached to radiators to disperse heat from them as well. 

 

Typically small fans cause more noise than a larger fan, and depending at what speed your fans is running at they may cause more noise as well.

 

Typical Fan Sizes

  1. 200mm
  2. 140mm
  3. 120mm
  4. 92mm 

120mm is usually the sweet spot for fan sizes since its a nearly perfect for good air flow with out being too noisy at moderate speeds.

 

Fan RPM Noise

  1. 1500RPM+ Noisy!
  2. 1200RPM   Moderately Noisy
  3. 1000RPM   Not that Noisy
  4. 800RPM     Very Tolerable

 

 

ODD

 

940x475xA58-7L.jpg.pagespeed.ic.hISk80PX

 

The Optical Disk Drive ( ODD ) is a disk writer or reader for you PC. These are slowly becoming out dated sBECUASE you can always download music, use a USB, and even install Windows through a USB. Every so often they do come in handy for backing up your music CDs to your PC or making your own DVDs(Burning Music or DVDs).

 

Some drives can be external through USB and also come in 'slim' versions to take up less space. 

 

When you are burning stuff to a CD/DVD/BluRay using your ODD it may run at certain speed depending what ODD you got.

 

 

OS

 

Windows_Product_Family_9-30-Event.png

 

397852-2046207165.gif

 

The Operating System ( OS ) is what you use to interact with the Computer aside from the BIOS/UEFI. 

 

The main OS used for gaming is Windows since most games are compatible for it. Another OS used for gaming is Linux but games for it are not as widely supported as on Windows, however, LINUX IS FREE. Some big titles such as Counter Strike are available on Linux, but you will have to do your research to see what games are supported in Linux. Also Linux does still have a pretty high learning curve so be prepared if you go the Linux route.

 

Cost of Windows

  1. Windows 8.1 OEM            $100
  2. Windows 8.1 Download    $110
  3. Windows 8.1 Full Version $120 Recommended!
  4. Windows 8.1 Pro              $140

Make sure you buy the 64bit version! 32bit is OUTDATED for desktop PCs!

 

 

Popular Versions of Linux

  • Ubuntu
  • Debian
  • Mint
  • Fedora

 

 

So now that we've gone through every component you can now get into building one!

 

 

So what makes a gaming PC a GAMING PC?

 

 

The two biggest performance givers in a PC are the CPU and GPU. A good CPU and GPU will give you excellent performance, HOWEVER some games may either be CPU bound or GPU bound. Really intensive 100+ multiplayer games will require a lot of CPU work to be done, so even if you have a $500 GPU you may not get all the pretty frames per a second if your CPU can't process the game logic fast enough so that the GPU can work in unison with it. 

 

Other games may not use the CPU so much but they may need a a power GPU to output lots of frames!

 

Sometimes BOTTLENECKING may occur if you have a weak link in your PC!

 

Informational Video on Bottlenecking

Spoiler

 

 

BEWARE! Some games may just be un-optimized and will have poor usage of either the CPU or GPU. Also some games may prefer AMD GPUs over Nvidia or it could be the other way around. 

 

Examples of Un-Optimized games 

  • Dragon Age Inquisition: No support for Dual Cores.
  • Far Cry 4: Nvidia GPU issues.
  • Assassins Creed Unity: Ran like shit, frame rate dips. 

Most issues get fixed in weeks, some times by Nvidia or AMD themselves with Driver updates so that their GPUs work better.

 

 

Building the PC

 

Building a PC is pretty simple!

 

Here are a few videos that take you through each step of building a PC!

 

Build Guide One

Spoiler

 

Build Guide Two

Spoiler

 

 

To be more specific for EACH part here are individual videos!

 

Spoiler

 

A good website to help you choose parts, check compatibility, and show you the best prices is PCPartPIcker. PCPartPicker is a database of the latest PC parts and comes with plenty of online tools to build a PC.

 

Link: http://pcpartpicker.com/

 

PCPartPicker Tools!

  • Database to the lasted PC hardware
  • Select PC parts and save the selected parts to a list
  • Wattage Calculator
  • Compatibility Checker, you will be warned at the bottom of the build page if something is wrong. 

 

After you finish building your PC then you have to install Windows. I recommend using the USB method to install since it is cheaper and quicker!

 

 Watch this video to install Windows through a USB!

 

Spoiler

 

 

After you install windows you may need download drivers to get your Internet working, or your Graphics card working, or built in WiFi. 

 

 

In this next section I will give out some 'base' builds at different tiers and prices. Feel free customize these base builds to your liking!

 

 

 

PC Builds

 

I will show case some gaming PC builds that I made on PC Part Picker. 

 

I will leave some notes on some of the PC builds to let you know about compatibility or future upgrade paths. Remember if you upgrade your CPU or GPU CHECK if your PSU has the wattage to support the new CPU or GPU. 

 

KEY

  • uCPU - CPU can be upgraded
  • xCPU - CPU has reach the final tier for being upgraded
  • uGPU - GPU can be upgraded
  • xGPU - GPU has reach the final tier for being upgraded
  • OC - The PC can be overclocked

 

Consoles

 

PlayStation 4

PS4: $400

 

XBOX ONE

Xbox One:                      $350

Two Years XBL:              $120

Headset Chat Adapter:   $30

Total:                               $500

 

Native Resolutions and Framerates for both Consoles

 

LINK: http://www.ign.com/w...and_Framerates 

 

 

Rookie Builds

 

$500 Build 

 
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-F2A68HM-DS2H Micro ATX FM2+ Motherboard  ($51.98 @ Newegg) 
Memory: Team Zeus Blue 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory  ($67.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R7 260X 2GB WINDFORCE Video Card  ($129.99 @ Newegg) 
Case: DIYPC Mirage-D1-Y ATX Mid Tower Case  ($39.79 @ Newegg) 
Power Supply: EVGA 500W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply  ($45.98 @ Newegg) 
Total: $498.68
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

 

Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 13:25 EST-0500
 
With Windows 8.1: 500 + 120 = $620

  • uCPU 
  • uGPU 
  • OC 
Gaming Performance
  1. 900p @ 60fps Med-High
  2. 1080p @ 60fps Med

 

$550 Build

 
Motherboard: MSI A68HM-E33 Micro ATX FM2+ Motherboard  ($55.38 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI Radeon R7 265 2GB Video Card  ($155.98 @ Newegg) 
Case: Cooler Master Elite 430 ATX Mid Tower Case  ($49.99 @ Newegg) 
Power Supply: EVGA 600B 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply  ($60.98 @ Newegg) 
Total: $557.27
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

 

Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 14:51 EST-0500

 

With Windows 8.1: 550 + 120 = $670

  • xCPU
  • uGPU 
  • OC 
Gaming Performance

 

  1. 900p @ 60fps High
  2. 1080p @ 60fps Med

 

$600 Build

 
Motherboard: MSI A88XM-E45 Micro ATX FM2+ Motherboard  ($77.99 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI Radeon R9 270X 2GB TWIN FROZR Video Card  ($169.99 @ Newegg) 
Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case  ($44.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $605.89
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 14:55 EST-0500
 
With Windows 8.1: 600 + 120 = $720

  • xCPU
  • uGPU 
  • OC 
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 60fps Med-High

*Bios May need to be updated before CPU can work!

 

 

$650 Build

 
Motherboard: MSI A88XM-E45 Micro ATX FM2+ Motherboard  ($77.99 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: XFX Radeon R9 285 2GB Double Dissipation Video Card  ($209.99 @ Newegg) 
Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case  ($44.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $645.89
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

 

Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 15:01 EST-0500

 

With Windows 8.1: 650 + 120 = $770

  • xCPU
  • uGPU 
  • OC 
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 60fps High

*GPUs over $300 may be too strong for the Athlon X4 860k

 

$650 Build 

 
Motherboard: MSI H97M-E35 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($81.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 960 2GB Video Card  ($209.99 @ Newegg) 
Power Supply: EVGA 600B 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply  ($60.98 @ Newegg) 
Total: $649.87
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 18:18 EST-0500

 

With Windows 8.1: 650 + 120 = $770

  • xCPU
  • uGPU 
  • OC 
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 60fps High

* The Pentium G3258 may have issues with some games that require 4 cores. 

 

 

$700 Build

 
Motherboard: MSI H97M-E35 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($81.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 960 2GB Video Card  ($209.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $697.88
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 18:22 EST-0500

 

With Windows 8.1: 700 + 120 = $820

  • uCPU
  • uGPU  
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 60fps High

 

Champion

 

$750 Build

 
Motherboard: MSI H97M-E35 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($81.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 960 2GB Video Card  ($209.99 @ Newegg) 
Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case  ($44.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $758.88
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

 

Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 18:24 EST-0500

 

With Windows 8.1: 750 + 120 = $870

  • uCPU
  • uGPU  
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 60fps High

 

$900 Build

 
Motherboard: MSI H97M-E35 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($81.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 960 2GB Video Card  ($209.99 @ Newegg) 
Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case  ($44.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $910.87
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 18:26 EST-0500

 

With Windows 8.1: 900 + 120 = $1020

  • uCPU
  • uGPU  
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 60fps High

 

$1050 Build

 
Motherboard: MSI H97M-E35 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($81.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 970 4GB Video Card  ($341.98 @ Newegg) 
Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case  ($44.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $1062.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 18:30 EST-0500

 

With Windows 8.1: 1050 + 120 = $1170

  • uCPU
  • uGPU  
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 120/60fps High
  2. 1440p @ 60fps Med-High

 

$1150 Build

 
Motherboard: MSI H97M-G43 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($94.99 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 970 4GB Twin Frozr V Video Card  ($344.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $1153.88
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 18:38 EST-0500

 

With Windows 8.1: 1150 + 120 = $1270

  • uCPU
  • uGPU  
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 120/60fps High
  2. 1440p @ 60fps Med-High

 

Ultimate

 

$1250 Build

 
Motherboard: MSI Z97-G45 Gaming ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($125.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 970 4GB Twin Frozr V Video Card  ($344.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $1242.87
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

 

Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 18:41 EST-0500

 

With Windows 8.1: 1250 + 120 = $1370

  • uCPU
  • uGPU  
  • OC  
 
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 120/60fps High
  2. 1440p @ 60fps Med-High

 

$1450 Build

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

 
Motherboard: MSI Z97-G45 Gaming ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($125.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 980 4GB Twin Frozr Video Card  ($564.98 @ Newegg) 
Total: $1462.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 18:44 EST-0500
 

With Windows 8.1: 1450 + 120 = $1570

  • uCPU
  • uGPU - SLI 
  • OC  
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 120/60fps Ultra
  2. 1440p @ 60fps Ultra
 
$1750 Build

 
Motherboard: MSI Z97-G45 Gaming ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($125.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 980 4GB Twin Frozr Video Card  ($564.98 @ Newegg) 
Case: Corsair 550D ATX Mid Tower Case  ($155.98 @ Newegg) 
Total: $1754.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 18:51 EST-0500
 

With Windows 8.1: 1750 + 120 = $1870

  • xCPU
  • uGPU - SLI 
  • OC  
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 120/60fps Ultra
  2. 1440p @ 60fps Ultra

*Heavy Work Station Build!

 

 

$2150 Build

 
CPU Cooler: Corsair H110i GT 113.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler  ($129.99 @ Newegg) 
Motherboard: Asus MAXIMUS VII HERO ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($213.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 980 4GB Video Card  ($662.98 @ Newegg) 
Case: Corsair 750D ATX Full Tower Case  ($159.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $2155.87
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

 

Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 20:11 EST-0500
 

With Windows 8.1: 2150 + 120 = $2270

  • xCPU
  • uGPU - SLI 
  • OC  
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 120/60fps Ultra
  2. 1440p @ 120fps Ultra
 
*Heavy Work Station Build!
 

 

Mega

 

$2800 Build


 
CPU Cooler: Corsair H110i GT 113.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler  ($129.99 @ Newegg) 
Motherboard: Asus MAXIMUS VII HERO ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($213.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 980 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI)  ($662.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 980 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI)  ($662.98 @ Newegg) 
Case: Corsair 750D ATX Full Tower Case  ($159.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $2818.85
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 20:14 EST-0500

 


With Windows 8.1: 2800 + 120 = $2920

  • xCPU
  • xGPU 
  • OC  
Gaming Performance
  1. 1080p @ 120/60fps Ultra
  2. 1440p @ 120fps Ultra
  3. 2160p( 4K ) @ 60fps High

*Heavy Work Station Build!

 

 

 

$3600 Build

 
CPU Cooler: Corsair H110i GT 113.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler  ($129.99 @ Newegg) 
Motherboard: Asus RAMPAGE V EXTREME EATX LGA2011-3 Motherboard  ($473.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 980 4GB Video Card  ($662.98 @ Newegg) 
Case: Corsair 750D ATX Full Tower Case  ($159.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $3705.45
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

 

Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 20:16 EST-0500

 

With Windows 8.1: 3600 + 120 = $3720

  • uCPU
  • uGPU 
  • OC  
Gaming Performance

 

  1. 1080p @ 120/60fps Ultra
  2. 1440p @ 120fps Ultra

*Heavy Work Station Build!

 

 

Ultra

 

 

$5650 Build

 
CPU: Intel Core i7-5960X 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor  ($1052.98 @ Newegg) 
CPU Cooler: Corsair H110i GT 113.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler  ($129.99 @ Newegg) 
Motherboard: Asus RAMPAGE V EXTREME EATX LGA2011-3 Motherboard  ($473.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 980 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI)  ($662.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 980 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI)  ($662.98 @ Newegg) 
Case: Corsair 750D ATX Full Tower Case  ($159.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $5675.23
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-07 20:19 EST-0500
 

 

With Windows 8.1: 5650 + 120 = $5770

  • xCPU
  • xGPU 
  • OC  
Gaming Performance

 

  1. 1080p @ 120/60fps Ultra
  2. 1440p @ 120fps Ultra
  3. 2160p( 4K ) @ 60fps High

*Heavy Work Station Build!

 

 

 

 

Happy gaming PC buying! Hope this helps and let me know if anything needs to be edited!


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#2   aKREZZ

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Posted 07 February 2015 - 10:44 PM

Nice post!


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#3   Synyster

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Posted 07 February 2015 - 11:26 PM

Holy shit dude. I feel like you could have just posted a link to logicalincrements and called it good.


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#4   AstuteCobra

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 01:43 AM

Amazing post.


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#5   Saucey

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 05:04 AM

Good lord.


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#6   ZerueLX11

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 05:20 AM

Good lord.


Lord GaBen you mean?

What do you think? :D
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#7   BuckN

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 03:59 PM

Excellent thread!

 

dhMeAzK.gif


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#8   BuckN

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 04:00 PM

Lol @ nvidia always being the king of GPUs.

 

We're going to pretend like the GTX4XX fiasco never happened?

 

brb having a GPU getting so hot it would melt other components.


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#9   Delementary

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 11:22 AM

Beast guide. Start saving boys, no excuses now.


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#10   amo819

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 01:10 PM

So much to read. 

 

Definitely need to buy something soon so I can start streaming and PC gaming again. 


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#11   ZerueLX11

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 03:34 PM

So much to read. 

 

Definitely need to buy something soon so I can start streaming and PC gaming again. 

 

That reminds me I should do a streaming guide as well!


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#12   amo819

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 03:38 PM

That reminds me I should do a streaming guide as well!

 

It would definitely be appreciated and would probably even draw traffic from outside just TeamBeyond members. People are always look for that information.

 

I most likely will be messaging you in the next couple days about a build if that's alright. 


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#13   Synyster

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 04:32 PM

 

 

I most likely will be messaging you in the next couple days about a build if that's alright. 

Just post it in here; computers are basically my life.


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#14   ZerueLX11

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 05:03 PM

It would definitely be appreciated and would probably even draw traffic from outside just TeamBeyond members. People are always look for that information.

 

I most likely will be messaging you in the next couple days about a build if that's alright. 

 

Sure thing! Free free to post in the Tech Support Thread to get help, I'd like to get more traffic on that thread as well.

 

Also, if I make a streaming guide along with a youtube video with "Free" as an emphasis, could I possibly get it uploaded to the Beyond Youtube channel? It could definitely draw more traffic to Beyond!


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#15   amo819

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 05:51 PM

That would be an @Saucey question. 


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#16   ZerueLX11

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 05:55 PM

Sure thing! Free free to post in the Tech Support Thread to get help, I'd like to get more traffic on that thread as well.
 
Also, if I make a streaming guide along with a youtube video with "Free" as an emphasis, could I possibly get it uploaded to the Beyond Youtube channel? It could definitely draw more traffic to Beyond!



@Saucey what do you think?
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#17   amo819

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 12:10 PM

Just post it in here; computers are basically my life.

 

Just leaning toward about a $1500 budget. 

 

Probably around 1200 for a gaming/streaming machine and another 300 to buy a monitor/keyboard/mouse. 

 

I have one monitor, but would probably want a second one. The $1500 isn't set in stone and could go a little higher if there is something worth getting or a little lower if I'm getting better value. 


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#18   Synyster

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 01:24 PM

Just leaning toward about a $1500 budget. 

 

Probably around 1200 for a gaming/streaming machine and another 300 to buy a monitor/keyboard/mouse. 

 

I have one monitor, but would probably want a second one. The $1500 isn't set in stone and could go a little higher if there is something worth getting or a little lower if I'm getting better value. 

$1500 is plenty. That's what I spent on my machine / set up to go from nothing to everything. 


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#19   ZerueLX11

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 01:46 PM



Just leaning toward about a $1500 budget. 

 

Probably around 1200 for a gaming/streaming machine and another 300 to buy a monitor/keyboard/mouse. 

 

I have one monitor, but would probably want a second one. The $1500 isn't set in stone and could go a little higher if there is something worth getting or a little lower if I'm getting better value. 

 

 
Motherboard: Asus Z97M-PLUS Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($129.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 970 4GB STRIX Video Card  ($343.98 @ Newegg) 
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case  ($69.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $1258.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-10 13:26 EST-0500
 
 
Here is a decent streaming build.
 
You have an SSD to open all your apps really fast, plus your favorite Steam games. Steam can download games to different hard drives, Origin only downloads to one  hard drives. Also you have 1TB for mass storage.
 
This PC is actually very good for streaming and content creation.
 
  • The CPU and Motherboard support Intel Quick Sync through OBS. Intel Quick Sync uses the iGPU on the CPU to do the stream encoding so game performance does not suffer when streaming PC games. Remember its not like using a capture card and PC with an Xbox for streaming, the PC is doing all the work with no help.  

  • Nvidia Shadowplay can record your PC footage with no performance loss since it has a built in H264 encoder.

  • The CPU and GPU destroy 1080p 60fps gaming on Ultra/High settings.

In other words

  1. iGPU does the streaming.

  2. Nvidia H264 encoder records the games.

  3. CPU and GPU play the games. 

 

 

Mouse keyboard and monitor are pretty personal, however the BenQ RL2460HT is pretty good for streaming and gaming. You can have both a console and PC hooked up to it if you want to stream both those things.

 

 

VIDEO

 


 

 

 

However, Im still a strong advocate for 144hz monitors :flames:  


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#20   amo819

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 02:00 PM

$1500 is plenty. That's what I spent on my machine / set up to go from nothing to everything. 

 

That's what I thought. Probably could go a little cheaper, but I'm also able to buy some of the stuff through work, so I'm saving there. 

 

 

 
Motherboard: Asus Z97M-PLUS Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($129.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 970 4GB STRIX Video Card  ($343.98 @ Newegg) 
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case  ($69.99 @ Newegg) 
Total: $1258.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-02-10 13:26 EST-0500
 
 
Here is a decent streaming build.
 
You have an SSD to open all your apps really fast, plus your favorite Steam games. Steam can download games to different hard drives, Origin only downloads to one  hard drives. Also you have 1TB for mass storage.
 
This PC is actually very good for streaming and content creation.
 
  • The CPU and Motherboard support Intel Quick Sync through OBS. Intel Quick Sync uses the iGPU on the CPU to do the stream encoding so game performance does not suffer when streaming PC games. Remember its not like using a capture card and PC with an Xbox for streaming, the PC is doing all the work with no help.  

  • Nvidia Shadowplay can record your PC footage with no performance loss since it has a built in H264 encoder.

  • The CPU and GPU destroy 1080p 60fps gaming on Ultra/High settings.

In other words

  1. iGPU does the streaming.

  2. Nvidia H264 encoder records the games.

  3. CPU and GPU play the games. 

 

Thank you for this. All great information for me to look at and even help educate my ignorance a little bit. Is this build easy to upgrade if there is a need? I'm assuming so from looking at it so far. 

 

I agree with the sentiment on mouse, keyboard, and monitors. I need to do some major research on them, but have a few different ideas from things I've seen/used. Already have 1 of the monitors you recommended, so I'll most likely pick up another just for aesthetic purposes. 


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#21   Synyster

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 02:28 PM

That's what I thought. Probably could go a little cheaper, but I'm also able to buy some of the stuff through work, so I'm saving there. 

 

 

Thank you for this. All great information for me to look at and even help educate my ignorance a little bit. Is this build easy to upgrade if there is a need? I'm assuming so from looking at it so far. 

 

I agree with the sentiment on mouse, keyboard, and monitors. I need to do some major research on them, but have a few different ideas from things I've seen/used. Already have 1 of the monitors you recommended, so I'll most likely pick up another just for aesthetic purposes. 

You can always save money somewhere, it just depends on where you want to save money. 

 

I'd recommend reading through logicalincrements.com before you buy any thing. The build Zeruel recommend is good, and won't need to be upgraded for awhile. Like I said early, I spent about $1500 on my build 2 plus years ago and I haven't had to upgrade anything, I've only added storage. However, I'd personally change a few things in that build, but that's just me. 


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#22   ZerueLX11

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 03:22 PM

That's what I thought. Probably could go a little cheaper, but I'm also able to buy some of the stuff through work, so I'm saving there. 

 

 

Thank you for this. All great information for me to look at and even help educate my ignorance a little bit. Is this build easy to upgrade if there is a need? I'm assuming so from looking at it so far. 

 

I agree with the sentiment on mouse, keyboard, and monitors. I need to do some major research on them, but have a few different ideas from things I've seen/used. Already have 1 of the monitors you recommended, so I'll most likely pick up another just for aesthetic purposes. 

 

Yeah the build I recommended will last you for a long time. The CPU will be good for at least 5 or 6 years plus you can always over clock it slightly, if you upgrade the cooler to keep it nice and cool expect a longer life span. Intel has strong IPC, their i5 processors stay good for gaming for a long time.

 

Nvidia GPUs last a pretty long time too, games are always changing but still consoles are holding on 'barely' to the 1080p 60fps standard that may keep the game industry back for a few years, however, the PC tech industry is still moving forward and right now everyone is in a race to 4k. So when you upgrade your GPU in 3 or 4 years expect 1080p gaming to be SUPER cheap or consider playing at 4k for the price you pay for 1080p Ultra settings 60fps now.

 

Also the PSU in the build I recommended is a 650w 80Plus Gold which which will even power a 980 with ease, that will last a few generations too since power efficiency is getting every year.   

 

Just look at the BETA benchmarks for BF Hardline

 

http://www.techspot....arks/page2.html

 

The GTX 960 costs $200 and with some slight tweaks you can get a constant 60fps on High, if you look up at the 970 stats that thing destroys...


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#23   TeRRoR

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 07:10 PM

@amo819 no one wants to watch you play halo 3 campaign.
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#24   amo819

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 07:50 PM

@amo819 no one wants to watch you play halo 3 campaign.

 

They'll watch me be terrible at Smash though. 

 

@ZerueLX11 I appreciate all the help man. Just trying to take it all in. 

 

@Synyster I love that website referred. Very informative and easy to read. 


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#25   Synyster

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 08:01 PM

They'll watch me be terrible at Smash though. 

 

@ZerueLX11 I appreciate all the help man. Just trying to take it all in. 

 

@Synyster I love that website referred. Very informative and easy to read. 

Learn one component at a time and you'll be fine. 


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